New Insect Attractant Lamp

Economic Review, October 1995 | Go to article overview
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New Insect Attractant Lamp


UltraViolet light has been used to attract flies to Electric Fly Killers since the 1950's. To this was added phosphorous glowing "blue" so that the humans could see the lamp. This "blue" light had no significant attractant effect on insects and was simply an indicator. There has been little development in Fly killer technology in the last 35 years, but that has now changed, with the recent introduction of a new type of Insect Attractant Lamp.

In 1990 at the Peter Cox Entomology Department carried our experiments that indicated that a green source of light had some attractant effect, thus enhancing the attractant capability of the Ultra Violet light. An insect attractant lamp which emitted light in near ultraviolet and green was developed.

This showed increased attraction over standard "blue" UV tubes of the same power. The attractiveness of green lights had also been previously investigated in 1970's by Kirkpatrick, Yancy and Markze and also Soderstrom against Stored Product Insects.

INSECT-O-CUTOR, the leading British Manufacturer of Flykillers, have developed a new green "Synergetic" Attraction Lamp and Independent tests on electricity killers carried out by a Cambridge University entomologist have also proven that Synergetic ultra-violet Ultra Violet green light insect attractant lamps are a more powerful lure than conventional Ultra Violet University of Cambridge Department of Medical Entomology, and David Hutcheson of Insect-o-cutor (Peter Cox Group), summarizes the tests which were carried out during March and April 1994 in controlled conditions at the Insect-o-cutor Entomological Laboratory, Stockport, using Cambridge-bred house-flies (Musca domestica).

Three series of tests confirmed that Synergetic Ultra Violet green light lamps caught 3o% more flies than traditional Ultra Violet blue light lamps, with 95% confidence limits.

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