Entertainment in Cyberspace: Business Opportunities and Exciting Options for Fun Await Those Who Venture Online

By Scott, Matthew S. | Black Enterprise, December 1995 | Go to article overview

Entertainment in Cyberspace: Business Opportunities and Exciting Options for Fun Await Those Who Venture Online


Scott, Matthew S., Black Enterprise


Hollywood film studios along with the recording, publishing and video game industries, have all found a new toy. It's the Internet, and they're betting that sooner or later, you'll want to come out and play with it.

Over the last year, entertainment-based sites on the World Wide Web have multiplied at what seems like warp speed. Why? Because in their insatiable quest for your almighty dollars, the powers within the entertainment industry have decided to hit you where you live-literally. With the help of personal computers, they plan to use the Internet as a direct line into your home to promote their music, films, magazines, games and related products.

It's a high-stakes game of coaxing consumers away from traditional sources of entertainment onto what has proven to be an efficient and cost-effective distribution system that's available 24 hours a day. Consumers experience the luxury of viewing movies and CDs before their release and can purchase them from the privacy of their own homes. Or, they can access up-to-the-minute information about popular stars or recording artists. They can even play video games against multiple players in different states.

For entertainment companies, the sales generated from the on-demand availability of entertainment products and user fees for access to entertainment services make the development of such sites on the Internet a potentially lucrative gamble.

"If you include all the online services worldwide, revenues are a little over $2 billion," says Pick Spence of Dataquest, an organization that tracks computer usage and conducts surveys. Will these entertainment Web sites produce similar revenues? That will depend on how many people are ready for an entertainment experience in cyberspace.

WHY THE ONLINE RUSH?

"Everybody needs and wants to be entertained and informed," says Lee Bailey, president of Bailey Broadcasting Services in Los Angeles (www.trib.com/bbs/bailey.html). "People will come online looking for the same things that they look for off line." Bailey publishes the Electronic Urban Report (EUR), a free online newsletter/e-zine that provides inside news on black and urban celebrities and entertainers. The report is actually an electronic companion to Bailey's flagship Radioscope urban entertainment broadcasts, which air in three-and-a-half minute segments and for an hour on weekends over about 110 urban radio stations nationwide.

Much of what is published in the EUR is compiled from the news gathering efforts of the Radioscope staff. This access to a steady stream of exclusive content made it easier and cheaper for Bailey to create his online service. "I saw EUR as a way to get a foothold in the cyberspace arena and at the same time establish a vehicle to promote Radioscope," he says.

Bailey's use of the Internet as a promotional tool is representative of the approach of most industry players. For example, Warner Music Group has a major presence on the Internet, including Web sites for the Warner Bros. Records Black Music Division (www.wbr.com/black), Elektra Entertainment Group (www.elektra.com), WarnerActive CD-ROM games division (www.warneractive.com) and Radio Aahs (www.pathfinder. com), a children's music magazine.

"We see the online form as reaching a variety of consumers. It's not just the college kids surfing the Net. It's also older people who like a sense of community and who like to explore," says Camille Hackney, manager of New Media Market Development for Warner Music Group.

In addition to using the Internet to reach specifically targeted audiences, other companies, such as Walt Disney, look to use the Net for greater strategic purposes. "We're taking the long-term view, says Dennis Hightower, president of Walt Disney Television and Telecommunications. "The Internet can become a fruitful foothold strategy--to acquaint both children and parents to the Disney brand, and begin to build loyalty at an early age. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Entertainment in Cyberspace: Business Opportunities and Exciting Options for Fun Await Those Who Venture Online
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.