Membership Input Needed for Update of Constitution and Bylaws

Corrections Today, December 1995 | Go to article overview

Membership Input Needed for Update of Constitution and Bylaws


Editor's note: For nearly a year, the Constitution and Bylaws Committee has been in the process of revising the Association's Constitution and Bylaws, which last were revised and approved in August 1988. The following is the committee's third draft. We are again requesting your input. Please send any suggestions, additions or changes by Jan. 5, 1996, to Gall Hughes, Box 211, California, MO 65018; (314) 796-2113; fax (314) 796-2114. If you would like to send your comments through e-mail, the address is ghdh@aol.com.

CONSTITUTION

I. The name of the Association is The American Correctional Association.

II. The Association is a corporation as defined in subparagraph (a) (5) of Sections 102 (Definitions) and 201 (Purposes) of the Not-for-Profit Corporation Law of the State of New York.

III. The purposes and objectives of the Association are as follows:

1. To provide professional association of persons, agencies, and organizations, both public and private, who hold in common the goal of bettering the profession of corrections and enhancing their contribution to that profession.

2. To encourage enrollment, as affiliates to the Association, of other organizations whose areas of interest, expertise, and concern have commonality with the field of corrections and whose goals and principles are consistent with those of the Association.

3. To establish corporate missions and promulgate and promote national corrections policies consistent with the Association's Declaration of Principles.

4.To develop standards for all areas of corrections and implement a system for accreditation for correctional programs, facilities and agencies based on these standards, where feasible standards shall be based on performance outcome.

5. To support laws and administrative procedures to safeguard the rights of corrections workers, offenders, and victims in the adult and juvenile correctional process.

6. To publish and distribute journals and other informative materials relating to criminology, crime prevention, and corrections and to encourage and stimulate research of these matters - such materials to include relevant statistical information, significant and validated research findings, forecasting trends, news of correctional programs and events, and discussions of concepts and ideas of current concern to the profession.

7. To conduct or sponsor corrections conferences, congresses, institutes, forums, seminars, and meetings.

8. To broaden and strengthen the support for Association goals by advocating Association policies, resolutions, positions, and standards to policymakers and the public and by forming coalitions with other professional organizations sharing these goals.

9. To implement an information program for legislators, government leaders, and the public in order to promote rational legislation governing the criminal justice process for adult and juvenile offenders.

10. To promote recognition of corrections as a profession, and those who work in corrections as professionals, and to ensure validity of that recognition by encouraging the recruitment and development of highly qualified staff.

11. To ensure representation of minorities, women, and other protected groups in the ranks of corrections professionals and to inform policymakers and the public of the importance of such representation for a safe and effective corrections system.

12. To promulgate and promote a code of correctional ethics applicable to individuals and to public and private agencies, institutions, programs, and services throughout the correctional field.

13. To create a registry to assist in correctional personnel recruitment and placement in cooperation with appropriate public and private agencies.

14. To stimulate the establishment by universities and other educational institutions of on-campus and extension courses preparing interested persons for work in the correctional field and for assisting employed personnel in the enhancement and advancement of their careers.

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Membership Input Needed for Update of Constitution and Bylaws
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