How Romance Blossomed among the Silent Readers

The Evening Standard (London, England), April 22, 2008 | Go to article overview

How Romance Blossomed among the Silent Readers


Byline: SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE

LADY Antonia Fraser complains that the British Library Reading Room hasbecome overrun by undergraduates who are hogging all the desks. Her fellowhistorian Tristram Hunt bemoans the fact it is now a "groovy place" to meet fora frappuccino. Many feared that when the old Reading Room closed, the BritishLibrary would lose its charm. Far from it. It has become more fashionable thanever as a social venue.

In Charles Dickens's day you had to take a vow of silence to get a ticket tothe Reading Room. It was a haven for intellectual endeavourKarl Marx pondered the tenets of world revolution here and Lenin used thepseudonym Jacob Richter LL D to gain entrance.

It's hard to believe Marx would ever get round to finishing Das Kapital if hewere alive today, given the dearth of desks. That may be no bad thing; butthink of all the other potentially great works of literature we might bedepriving ourselves of.

Yet the British Library has long been a venue for covert liaisonsand silence was very much part of its romantic appeal. Michael Holroyd, thebiographer of George Bernard Shaw, says the playwright was always falling inlove there: "He wrote countless love letters and poems to women he fancied butnever had the courage to approach in the library." Malcolm Bradbury also fellin love here as a postgraduate at London University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Romance Blossomed among the Silent Readers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.