Communication Difficulties Cited by Users of Ketamine

Clinical Psychiatry News, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Communication Difficulties Cited by Users of Ketamine


CORONADO, CALIF. -- The top three perceived benefits of ketamine use are decreased stress levels, dissociation from daily life, and connectedness with other people, results from a Canadian survey suggest.

Meanwhile, the top three perceived adverse side effects include communication difficulties, difficulty with speech articulation, and nosebleeds from snorting.

"Our study highlights several potential adverse effects of ketamine use that have not been frequently reported or otherwise investigated," Dr. Tim Guimond and his associates wrote in a poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

"Abdominal pain and communication problems have rarely been cited in case reports and reviews, and yet appear with high frequency in this study. Further, some specific adverse events ... appear with greater frequency among frequent ketamine users and may help identify problems related to use."

The researchers conducted an Internet survey of 226 ketamine users who were recruited by the Toronto Raver Information Project, which provides on-site harm reduction education and support to youth who attend raves in the area.

The mean age of the study participants was 22 years, and more than half (54%) were men, reported Dr. Guimond, a psychiatrist at the center for addiction and mental health at the University of Toronto. Of the 226 survey respondents, 77 were frequent ketamine users (defined as using once per week or more), whereas the remainder (149) were infrequent users. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Communication Difficulties Cited by Users of Ketamine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.