Agency Seeks Comment on Proposed Safety Rule

By Napoli, Denise | Clinical Psychiatry News, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Agency Seeks Comment on Proposed Safety Rule


Napoli, Denise, Clinical Psychiatry News


Draft federal regulations more than 2 years in the making aim to give hospital networks, physician groups, and similar organizations the ability to help doctors reduce medical errors and improve the quality of care they provide to patients.

The 72-page proposed rule offers the government's first pass on how to implement the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 and gives guidance on how to create confidential patient safety organizations (PSOs). Comments on the proposed rule are being accepted until April 14.

First called for by the Institute of Medicine in its 1999 report "To Err is Human," PSOs will be entities to which physicians and other health care providers can voluntarily report "patient safety events" with anonymity and without fear of tort liability. PSOs will collect, aggregate, and analyze data and provide feedback to help clinicians and health care organizations improve on those events in the future, according to the law and proposed rule.

In an interview, Dr. Bill Munier, director of the Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety at the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, said that patient safety events can be anything from health care-associated infections and patient falls to adverse drug reactions and wrong-site surgery.

According to the proposed rule, "a patient safety event may include an error of omission or commission, mistake, or malfunction in a patient care process; it may also involve an input to such process (such as a drug or device) or the environment in which such process occurs."

The term is intentionally more flexible than the more commonly used "medical errors" to account for not only traditional health care settings, but also for patients participating in clinical trials, and for ambulances, school clinics, and even locations where a provider is not present, such as a patient's home, according to the rule.

Until now, there has been no clear guidance on how an organization can become a PSO. But according to the proposed rule, public and private entities, both for-profit and not-for-profit, can seek listing as a PSO. This includes individual hospitals, hospital networks, professional associations, and almost any group related to providers with a solid network through which safety information can be aggregated and analyzed, Dr. …

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Agency Seeks Comment on Proposed Safety Rule
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