UK Happy Shopping Online, Says Word of Mouth Advertising

The Birmingham Post (England), April 29, 2008 | Go to article overview

UK Happy Shopping Online, Says Word of Mouth Advertising


Byline: CHRIS TOMLINSON

It is common knowledge that when people have a good customer experience they only tell one person, but when they have a bad one, they tell at least ten.

But according to our old friend, 'a recent survey', this doesn't seem to be true online.

By way of example, I must tell you never to stay at the Corus Hotel in Hyde Park.

I did last week and neither the heating nor shower worked. But having now shared this negative experience with slightly more than ten people offline, I still haven't logged in to tripadviser.com to leave a damning review.

It seems I'm not alone in not wanting to leave negative reviews on websites.

The survey, commissioned by BazaarVoice, a company that specialises in facilitating online ratings, found that over 80 per cent of all reviews written by UK customers online are positive. Now this surprises me!

Can the country that gave birth to Victor Meldrew really be so content?

I know as a nation we often accuse ourselves of not complaining enough, but that's because we don't like to create a fuss. Online we have the optional protection of anonymity and no onlookers to pass judgement.

According to one Antipodean nation, we are supposed to be pretty good at whingeing, so why do so few Poms do it online?

Perhaps it is because we are mostly happy with our online shopping experiences. Compared to retailing in the flesh, with all that trudging around busy stores and dealing with brain dead shop assistants, it's a delight to transact online. …

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