Using an Online Assessment System to Support the Program Report Process in Physical Education Teacher Education: Simplify Your Program Accreditation Process!

By Everhart, Brett; Mckethan, Robert | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, April 2008 | Go to article overview

Using an Online Assessment System to Support the Program Report Process in Physical Education Teacher Education: Simplify Your Program Accreditation Process!


Everhart, Brett, Mckethan, Robert, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


In teacher education programs across the country, the latest trend within the accreditation process is to integrate assessment systems with online assessment products (OAPs). These products or systems enable academic programs to collect and store candidate artifacts that are aligned with professional standards and assessed by faculty using appropriate rubrics. The development and implementation of such an assessment system is one of the most important initiatives a program can undertake. Consequently, the intent of this article is to discuss how to use an OAP to support the preparation of the program report for accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). It is not the intent to show all the elements that should be included within the report, but rather to offer a guide for setting up and using an OAP by showing selected examples of an OAP in place.

To understand the value of an OAP, imagine an accreditation site visit in which the visiting team requests a number of artifacts to demonstrate examples of candidates' work in relation to specific standards, as well as a report showing how various demographic groups performed. In addition, the team asks for proof that the process for measuring the performance of candidates is reliable. It is possible to fulfill these requests without an OAP, but it would be a much more difficult and time-consuming process: phone calls would be made and emails sent to various faculty and administrators to piece together the evidence needed in a painstaking effort. An OAP can streamline this process.

The Program Review Process

The assessment and accreditation needs of programs most often revolve around the NCATE standards and specialized program assessment (SPA) standards, which, for physical education, have been devised by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE).

In 2001, NCATE officially began a new accreditation process that required the academic program areas to demonstrate that their candidates were meeting the competencies outlined in the list of standards provided by professional organizations and NCATE. This revision of the accreditation process meant that programs must align artifacts to standards and outcomes and meaningfully assess those artifacts to demonstrate candidate proficiency. For example, academic programs must show evidence of planning ability, teaching performance, impact on P-12 student learning, and content knowledge demonstrated by the satisfactory completion of standardized licensure exams.

Once academic programs have decided on the specific assessments that are to be used to demonstrate candidate proficiency, they must produce three years worth of aggregated data on program graduates. Due to the requirement of multiple data types, assessment instruments, and descriptions used to create a new alignment with professional standards, it would probably be more helpful if an electronic assessment system were used on a formative, regular basis to collect, store, and report the data each academic year. One way to do this electronically is for the unit, institution, or academic program to develop a relationship with a company that provides an OAP. Depending on the specific company, an OAP should have the flexibility to be able to collect, aggregate, and interpret any data required for various types of accreditation processes.

A JOPERD feature in 2006 published guidelines written by PETE professionals to assist colleagues in meeting expectations for accreditation purposes. The articles discussed how PETE programs could develop a comprehensive process for building an effective assessment system (Senne, 2006), how to create appropriate rubrics (Lund, 2006), and how to interpret which evidence and assessments are related to the 10 NASPE standards required for the NCATE program report (Hacker, 2006; Mitchell, 2006). Additionally, Martin and Judd (2006) described what reviewers look for when conducting a program review. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using an Online Assessment System to Support the Program Report Process in Physical Education Teacher Education: Simplify Your Program Accreditation Process!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.