A Liberal Profile

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

A Liberal Profile


Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A liberal profile

"Here are two things we learned [Tuesday night]. First, Barack Obama is going to almost certainly be the Democratic [presidential] nominee. He's withstood seven weeks of bad news, and he still exceeded expectations," David Brooks writes in a blog at www.nytimes.com.

"The second thing we learned is that this general election is going to look nothing like the last two. Those elections were base-mobilization elections. The candidates did little to upset party orthodoxy or move dramatically toward the center. That won't work this time," Mr. Brooks said.

"The extended primary season has changed the profile of Obama supporters. Back in Iowa, he seemed to gather post-partisan and bipartisan support. He was strong among independents. But if you look at the exit polls from [Tuesday] and from the recent primaries, one thing leaps out at you: The further left you go, the more support Obama gets. The more centrist a voter is, the less likely he or she is to support him. Once upon a time, Obama had strong support from wide swathes of very religious people. Now he has wide swathes of support among secular voters.

"Obama has a much more liberal profile than he did several weeks ago. Moderate, independent voters are now less sure that Obama shares their values. Hillary Clinton voters are much, much more hostile toward him. His supporters look more and more like the McGovern-Dukakis constituency, and the walls between that constituency and the rest of the country are higher than they were weeks ago."

Rendell for veep

"The notion that Barack Obama should pick Hillary Clinton as his vice presidential running mate is crazy," Fred Barnes writes at www.weeklystandard.com.

"She passes the first test of a veep selection: she's a plausible president. But she fails the second. She doesn't qualify as a partner on the Democratic ticket (and possibly in the White House) that Obama would be comfortable with - far from it," Mr. Barnes said.

"But there is someone who does meet these two requirements, plus a third one and maybe a fourth. That person is Democratic Gov. Edward Rendell of Pennsylvania. Yes, Rendell was the leading supporter of Clinton when she trounced Obama in the Pennsylvania presidential primary last month. But he's a smart, tough, and respected politician who would no doubt embrace Obama eagerly, fully, and loyally. ...

"What would Rendell, 64, bring to the ticket? As governor

of a major state, he's automatically a national political figure He's also a former general chairman of the Democratic National Committee, which means he's a party man who gets along with Democrats of all types. ...

"Obama starts from a weak position

in [Pennsylvania] In losing the primary, he fared poorly among Catholics, working-class women, and downscale white voters. Rendell would corral them for Obama, most of them anyway."

Two parties in one

"There are two main parts of the Democratic Party," longtime party operative James Carville writes in the Financial Times. …

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A Liberal Profile
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