Policy Conflict in Intergovernmental Relations: The Changing Role of Local Authorities in the Goverance of Local Economic Development in Post-Devolution Scotland

By Bennett, Mike; Fairley, John | International Journal of Economic Development, January 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Policy Conflict in Intergovernmental Relations: The Changing Role of Local Authorities in the Goverance of Local Economic Development in Post-Devolution Scotland


Bennett, Mike, Fairley, John, International Journal of Economic Development


Abstract

This paper explores the impact of devolution on Local Economic Development with specific reference to the role of local authorities, and locates this study within broader debates about policy change. We explain the institutional framework for Local Economic Development in Scotland inherited by devolution and we consider the process of devolution to date and recent policy change in this area, including Community Planning and reform of the Enterprise Network. Throughout the paper looks at issues of fragmentation, divergence and power in inter-governmental relations between key actors and institutions. The findings of original research into the attitudes and perceptions of local government actors are located within this context and compared with existing data. The analysis outlines the main area of conflict between central and local government in this area and suggests that economic development activity is becoming increasingly centralised post-devolution. In conclusion we offer suggestions as to what this tells us about broader inter-governmental relations ands the impact of constitutional change.

Introduction

In 2001, the authors (1) received funding from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to research the impact of the new Scottish Parliament on local government. One strand of the project focused on the impact of the Parliament on the roles of local authorities in economic development.

Much of the recent literature on the nature of policy making and policy change has focused on the relationships between different institutions and actors in various policy communities. The key issues that arise from this literature concern the fragmentation and conflict within and between different levels of government. This "differentiated polity" (Rhodes 1997). The differentiated polity concept is used to describe the interdependencies between different institutions and actors including policy making and implementation agencies, specialised bureaucracies and different levels of government. Rhodes, for example, drawing on Wright, emphasises bargaining and dynamic exchanges between actors within structured political contexts. This emphasis on bargaining has recently been seen in the debate about the "dialectic" in policy networks in which agents interact with and change, yet are constrained by, their structural context (for example Marsh and Smith 2000; Dowding 2001; Marsh and Smith 2001).

The value of this description is that seems to take account of the agonistic (Mouffe 2000) nature of policy making in which policy values, conflicts over status and resources are all essentially contested. It is this understanding of power, conflict and politics between groups with different interests which informs our explorations of governance and change in the following sections.

In this context the paper explores the impact of devolution on Local Economic Development with specific reference to the role of local authorities, and locates this study within broader debates about policy change. We explain the institutional framework for Local Economic Development in Scotland inherited by devolution and we consider the process of devolution to date. We also consider key policy developments, including Community Planning and reform of the Enterprise Network. Our research into the attitudes and perceptions of local government actors is located within this context and compared with existing data. The analysis outlines the main area of conflict between central and local government and suggests that post-devolution economic development activity is increasingly centralised. In conclusion we offer suggestions as to what this tells us about broader inter-governmental relations and the impact of constitutional change.

Local Economic Development in Scotland

There is a long history of Local Economic Development in Scotland. By the mid-1960s, Scotland was developing a distinctive set of institutions for economic development (Fairley and Lloyd 1995 and 1998).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Policy Conflict in Intergovernmental Relations: The Changing Role of Local Authorities in the Goverance of Local Economic Development in Post-Devolution Scotland
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.