The Society for Conservation Biology Comes to Chattanooga, Tennessee, for Its 2008 Annual Meeting

By Wallace, Richard L. | Appalachian Heritage, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

The Society for Conservation Biology Comes to Chattanooga, Tennessee, for Its 2008 Annual Meeting


Wallace, Richard L., Appalachian Heritage


The Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) will hold its 2008 annual meeting in Chattanooga, Tennessee, on July 13-18. SCB is an international professional organization dedicated to advancing the science and practice of conserving the Earth's biological diversity. The Society's more than 12,000 members from over 140 countries comprise a wide range of people interested in the conservation and study of biological diversity: resource managers, educators, government and private conservation workers, and students.

SCB is the leading voice for the study of the scientific phenomena that affect biodiversity conservation, publishing the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the field, Conservation Biology. The Society is dedicated to linking conservation science, management, policy, and education with its award-winning magazine, Conservation. Affiliated publications include Biological Conservation and Pacific Conservation Biology.

Each year since 1987, SCB has held an annual meeting at a different location, to highlight local biodiversity issues, the diverse nature of conservation challenges, and the need for international cooperation and collaboration to achieve successful biodiversity conservation. Recent meetings have occurred in Port Elizabeth, South Africa (2007), San Jose, California (2006), Brasilia, Brazil (2005), New York City (2004), Duluth, Minnesota (2003), Canterbury, United Kingdom (2002), and Hilo, Hawaii (2001). The 2009 meeting is currently being planned for Beijing, China.

SCB'S 2008 annual meeting is hosted by the Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. It will bring more than 1800 international conservation professionals to Chattanooga and provide an opportunity to highlight that city's conservation success story. It will also showcase the region's natural beauty through many field trips associated with the meeting.

Chattanooga is rich in American history and culture (from the Native American relocation with the start of the Trail of Tears to the Civil War and the Battle of Lookout Mountain to Glenn Miller's famous song "Chattanooga Choo Choo"). …

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The Society for Conservation Biology Comes to Chattanooga, Tennessee, for Its 2008 Annual Meeting
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