Conference Preview: A Parent-and-Child Balancing Act

Marketing, May 21, 2008 | Go to article overview

Conference Preview: A Parent-and-Child Balancing Act


It may not be straightforward, but marketing to the whole family with care will pay dividends, writes Joe Thomas.

Book now to learn how to market effectively to the young and their guardians. Call 020 8267 4011.

Whether it was the latest craze or must-have toy, every parent will at some point have had to deal with a clothes-tugging child pleading for some item or another. Parents are often reluctant to give in without prior knowledge of what they are being asked to buy; others feel guilty for saying no and head straight to the shops.

With more than 400 brands recognised by the average 10-year-old, the challenge for marketers is to ensure their brand's product is attractive to both children and parents.

Getting the balance right between the two groups is not only complicated, but also carries with it the risks of litigation, controversy and negative associations, should a particular campaign backfire.

One brand that manages to target children pertinently is the British Heart Foundation (BHF). Its 'Food4Thought' and 'Junkmonkeys' campaigns encourage the young to think about the food they eat.

'Heart disease is not something that magically hits a 50-year-old man out of the blue - lifestyle plays a key role and looking after your heart from an early age has a very important part to play,' explains David Barker, head of communications at the BHF and a speaker at the upcoming Marketing to Children & Parents Conference.

Choosing the right channel through which to target a young audience is vital. With food brands battling against the restrictions on advertising to children, and the fears associated with young people and the internet, companies need to approach campaigns with caution.

Parent power

Including the targeting of parents and guardians can also be essential 'The younger children are, the more important it is to target peer groups, parents and people who have the greatest influence on lives,' says Barker.

Jennifer Howze, lifestyle editor at Times Online, agrees that aiming campaigns at parents is important because, ultimately, they wield the power over family spend, though control over the finances within the family unit is beginning to shift. 'Overwhelmingly, women still make the big decisions regarding what to buy,' she says. However, she adds that spending power is shifting away from the mother holding the purse strings for child-centric purchases towards fathers.

The advent of web 2.0 has also brought an influential medium with which to reach young people. 'Increasingly the first thing tweens do when they get home is switch on their computer,' says Barker.

However, a tricky challenge when approaching children is to avoid putting off their parents. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conference Preview: A Parent-and-Child Balancing Act
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.