Wall Has Place in Neil's Heart; Popular Archaeologist Neil Oliver Has Identified Hadrian's Wall as His Favourite Place. the Journal's Ben Guy Finds out Why

The Journal (Newcastle, England), May 22, 2008 | Go to article overview

Wall Has Place in Neil's Heart; Popular Archaeologist Neil Oliver Has Identified Hadrian's Wall as His Favourite Place. the Journal's Ben Guy Finds out Why


HISTORY expert and television presenter Neil Oliver is wellknown for skirting the coastline of Britain in the television series Coast, but in a programme tonight he chooses somewhere further inland as his top historical location.

The celebrity archaeologist has chosen a North East landmark as his favourite place, highlighting Hadrian's Wall as the place he most likes to visit.

He said: "As an archaeologist I appreciate it as the most elaborate part of the boundary of the Roman empire anywhere in the world.

"They went to more trouble to underline their presence in that part of the British Isles than anywhere else, and in that way it is a landmark superior to any other in the Roman world.

"And being from Dumfries I remember going on family days out and school trips, so it is a vein that runs through my interest in history and archaeology."

The programme is one of a series entitled My Favourite Place, which feature personalities taking viewers on a tour of their favourite English Heritage properties around the country.

In the programme Neil examines the history of the Wall, and the relevance of the decisions the Romans made to modern-day Britain.

He said: "The Romans shaped so much of what we now know as England and Scotland.

"The Wall doesn't represent the border between the two countries, but the fact that they drew the line so close to it nearly 2,000 years ago is clearly significant."

And he said it wasn't just the geographical significance of the site that makes it special, as the discovery of the tablets at Vindolanda gives a real insight into the lives of people living in and around the Wall during that era.

The tablets are a series of letters written on wooden or wax bases by Romans, which have been discovered at the site in recent years.

Neil added: "The letters bring it to life and it makes it fascinating to speculate on how life was.

"In them you read of people complaining about the roads.

"You normally associate the Romans with the roads they built, so to hear them complaining about the quality of the roads in the letters is really interesting."

On top of the historical interest of the wall, Neil said the scenery surrounding the site added to the allure of the area. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wall Has Place in Neil's Heart; Popular Archaeologist Neil Oliver Has Identified Hadrian's Wall as His Favourite Place. the Journal's Ben Guy Finds out Why
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.