Profile: Local Instinct - Will Ghali, Marketing Director, Cobra Beer

Marketing, May 28, 2008 | Go to article overview

Profile: Local Instinct - Will Ghali, Marketing Director, Cobra Beer


Since he made the switch from soft drinks to the harder stuff last summer, Will Ghali has had a busy time of it. Taking Cobra Beer beyond its Indian restaurant heartland has been an all-consuming project for the ex-PepsiCo marketer ever since his appointment as marketing director for the brand.

In a pounds 14m push aimed at persuading consumers to demand the beer in their local, agencies have been hired and fired apace. Landor Associates has been drafted in for packaging design, Initials for direct marketing and Manning Gottlieb OMD for media, all in the space of a few short months. Just about the only agency that Ghali has stuck with is Joshua G2, which has developed an pounds 8.4m ad campaign for the brand, spanning cinema, outdoor, press, digital and TV.

The campaign introduces three animated 'everyman' characters exchanging banter in a pub. Ghali says the strapline, 'Now you're talking', works both on an emotional and functional level; drinking beer in a pub is essentially a convivial activity, but Cobra is also 'less gassy than other beers, so doesn't bloat you or get in the way of conversation'.

For authenticity, the TV ads, which break in September, feature unscripted dialogue from a real-life 'blokish' threesome who were holed up together for three hours with a few suggested conversation topics and a supply of Cobra.

Ghali says he wants the activity to transform Cobra from 'ethnic, quirky and complicated' to a positioning that is 'modern, exotic and cosmopolitan'. However, he stresses that the marketing drive is not about abandoning the brand's heritage; the ethnic restaurant sector is still important, and will support its move into the mainstream.

Ghali, 38, was brought up in Egypt, but moved to England at the age of 15 when his Egyptian father died and his English mother decided to return home. He admits that swapping Cairo for the South Midlands town of Redditch in the early 80s came as something of a culture shock.

'The first couple of years were quite difficult in terms of adjusting,' he says. 'The way I coped with it was just to get my head down and work to get good grades and go to university.' He is still in contact with friends and family from Cairo, and was recently called upon to act as best man for one of them, which involved giving the traditional speech in Arabic. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Profile: Local Instinct - Will Ghali, Marketing Director, Cobra Beer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.