Social Network Analysis Based on BSP Clustering Algorithm

By Yu, Gong | Communications of the IIMA, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Social Network Analysis Based on BSP Clustering Algorithm


Yu, Gong, Communications of the IIMA


ABSTRACT

Social network analysis is a new research field in data mining. The clustering in social network analysis is different from traditional clustering. It requires grouping objects into classes based on their links as well as their attributes. While traditional clustering algorithms group objects only based on objects' similarity, and it can't be applied to social network analysis. So on the basis of BSP (business system planning) clustering algorithm, a social network clustering analysis algorithm is proposed. The proposed algorithm, different from traditional clustering algorithms, can group objects in a social network into different classes based on their links and identify relation among classes.

INTRODUCTION

Social network analysis, which can be applied to analysis of the structure and the property of personal relationship, web page links, and the spread of messages, is a research field in sociology. Recently social network analysis has attracted increasing attention in the data mining research community. From the viewpoint of data mining, a social network is a heterogeneous and multi-relational dataset represented by graph (Han & Kamber, 2006).

Research on social network analysis in the data mining community includes following areas: clustering analysis (Bhattacharya & Getoor, 2005; Kubica, Moore and Schneider, 2003), classification (Lu & Getoor, 2003), link prediction (Liben-Nowell & Kleinberg, 2003; Krebs, 2002). Other achievements include PageRank (Page, Brin, Motwani and Winograd, 1998) and Hub-Authority (Kleinberg, 1999) in web search engine.

In this paper, clustering analysis of social network is studied. In the second section, a social network clustering algorithm is proposed based on BSP clustering algorithm. The algorithm can group objects in a social network into different classes based on their links, and it can also identify the relations among classes. In the third section, an example of social network clustering algorithm is presented, and then the conclusion and the future work direction are given.

SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS BASED ON BSP CLUSTERING

There has been extensive research work on clustering in data mining. Traditional clustering algorithms (Han & Kamber, 2006) divide objects into classes based on their similarity. Objects in a class are similar to each other and are very dissimilar from objects in different classes.

Social network clustering analysis, which is different from traditional clustering problem, divides objects into classes based on their links as well as their attributes. The biggest challenge of social network clustering analysis is how to divide objects into classes based on objects' links, thus we need find algorithms that can meet this challenge.

The BSP (business system planning) clustering algorithm (Gao, Wu and Yu, 2002) is proposed by IBM. It designed to define information architecture for the firm in business system planning. This algorithm analyses business process and their data classes, cluster business process into sub-systems, and define the relationship of these sub-systems.

Basically BSP clustering algorithm uses objects (business processes) and links among objects (data classes) to make clustering analysis. Similarly social network also includes objects and links among these objects. In view of the same pre-condition, the BSP clustering algorithm can be used in social network clustering analysis.

According to graph theory, social network is a directed graph composed by objects and their relationship. Figure 1 shows a sample of social network, the circle in the figure represents an object; the line with arrow is an edge of the graph, and it represents directed link between two objects, so a social network is a directed graph.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

In figure 1, let [O.sub.i] be an object in social network (i = 1 ... m), let [E. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Social Network Analysis Based on BSP Clustering Algorithm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.