An Evaluation on Academic Performance in Intermediate Microeconomics: A Case of Persistence

By Yang, Chin W.; Raehsler, Rod D. | Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, January 2007 | Go to article overview

An Evaluation on Academic Performance in Intermediate Microeconomics: A Case of Persistence


Yang, Chin W., Raehsler, Rod D., Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research


ABSTRACT

This paper uses an ordered-probit model on a sample of 488 students who enrolled in intermediate microeconomics. Analysis on the estimated model and further study into the marginal impact of each explanatory variable shows that a phenomenon of persistence can be used to describe final grades in intermediate microeconomics. A strong academic performance in principles of microeconomics translates to a higher probability of earning a high grade in intermediate microeconomics. We also show that mathematical preparation has a positive effect on the grade in intermediate microeconomics as well as enrollment in a remedial mathematics course for students deficient in mathematical preparation when entering college. Gender and academic major do not have a discernable effect on the grade distribution in intermediate microeconomics.

INTRODUCTION

A principles of microeconomics course provides students with a basic understanding of consumer theory and the theory of the firm without the need of calculus. Intermediate microeconomics, on the other hand, presents a more detailed theoretical extension of the principles course with greater emphasis on mathematical concepts covered in a basic business calculus course. Von Allmen and Brower (1998) showed that academic performance in calculus was an important determinant to student performance in intermediate microeconomics. Unfortunately, they used a relatively small sample size (n=99) and did not consider how academic performance in the principles of microeconomics influenced the final grade in intermediate microeconomic theory. This is an important venture in that it helps underscore the learning process in economics. The concept of persistence in the learning process suggests that the final grades in the principles of microeconomics and the intermediate microeconomics courses should be positively correlated.

Literature studying factors influencing academic performance has been very extensive in recent years beginning with a significant number of articles devoted to the economics discipline and expanding to a large number of other business disciplines. The vast majority of work concentrates on student performance in the principles of macroeconomics and the principles of microeconomics courses offered by all universities. The prevalence of studies devoted to the beginning courses in economics is primarily a result of the availability of large data sets due to greater demand for these courses. Spector and Mazzeo (1980) present a study of grades in introductory economics close to the approach of our analysis by utilizing a probit model to determine factors influencing final grades. Borg and Shapiro (1996), Becker and Watts (1999), Ziegert (2000), Marburger (2001), Cohn, Cohn, Balch, and Bradley (2001), Walstad (2001), and Grimes (2002) are a few important examples of studies that discuss evaluation of students and faculty in a principles of economics environment. An equally significant amount of literature has been devoted to teaching methods and techniques in principles of macroeconomics and principles of microeconomics courses. Examples of this growing area of analysis include Sowey (1983), Borg, Mason, and Shapiro (1989), Watts and Bosshardt (1991), Becker and Watts (1996), Raehsler (1999), Vachris (1999), Parks (1999), Oxoby (2001), Becker and Watts (2001a, 2001b), Colander (2003), and Jensen and Owen (2003).

To somewhat of a lesser extent, work has recently been done to determine factors relevant to grades earned by students in upper-level economics courses as well as courses in related business disciplines. Froyen (1996), Salemi (1996), Findlay (1999), Gartner (2001), Borg and Stranahan (2002), Walsh (2002), and Weerapana (2003) represent a good cross section of papers dealing with teaching intermediate macroeconomics and related upper-level economics courses. Becker (1987) and Becker and Greene (2001) are notable examples of research on student performance in business statistics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Evaluation on Academic Performance in Intermediate Microeconomics: A Case of Persistence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.