State Funds Key in Nursing Shortage

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), June 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

State Funds Key in Nursing Shortage


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Mary Spilde

Our community faces a shortage of well-trained nurses, a problem thoroughly documented in a recent series in The Register-Guard. This is a challenge shared by the state and nation as our population grows and ages. All of us need and deserve high-quality nursing care. Lane Community College has been pursuing proactive strategies to address this challenge.

Lane is the only provider of associate degree nursing education in Lane County. A large majority of our graduates stay in Lane County to meet the local labor force demand. Our students are tremendously successful despite the rigors and expense of training or the limitations imposed on the college's insufficient public funding.

Our nursing graduates are among the nation's best, achieving a 96.43 percent pass rate on their national licensure exams - much higher than the national average of 85.05 percent or the state average of 89.68 percent. Still, to do more and meet current and future training demands, we need the support of the community and the state.

With two new hospitals being built in the Eugene-Springfield area, Lane County will be a hub for health care services in the southern Willamette Valley. Integral to the success of our local hospitals is a supply of high-quality, well-trained health care professionals, especially nurses.

Nursing training is one of the costliest programs that LCC provides. The wrenching decline in state revenue for community colleges over the past several years has presented challenges in supporting expensive programs. Nonetheless, Lane has made a commitment to increasing health care education and being the center of excellence for health care education in our region.

Lane's elected board recognizes the college's role in training nurses and other health care professionals, including paramedics, respiratory therapists, medical office assistants and physical therapy assistants. The board has approved curricula and partnerships to ensure that Lane continues to be part of the solution. Here are some of things we're doing:

Lane joined the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education and began offering this opportunity to students last fall. This program allows Lane students to complete their associate's degree and enter practice or continue their education through Oregon Health and Science University and achieve a bachelor's degree in one more year without leaving the area.

This is important to our students because many are parents and working people who need to keep their jobs and families going while increasing their skills and employability. Through OCNE, we offer prerequisites and curriculum common to 11 other community colleges in the state as well as OHSU. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

State Funds Key in Nursing Shortage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.