Health Fears as One in Three Girls Incorrectly Thinks Theyre Overweight - ; Size: Distorted Body Image Is Common

Daily Mail (London), June 18, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Health Fears as One in Three Girls Incorrectly Thinks Theyre Overweight - ; Size: Distorted Body Image Is Common


Byline: Lucie van den Berg

ONE in three 15-year-old girls in Ireland wrongly believe that they aretoo fat, new figures from the World Health Organisation reveal.

Distorted body images are not just restricted to young girls with 15 per centof boys in the same age group mistakenly thinking they are overweight.

These startling figures show that youngsters are being exposed to societalpressures to be the dangerously slim size zero at an extremely vulnerable age.

The latest report on health inequalities in young people shows that between 19and 20 per cent of 11-year-olds think they are overweight or obese according tothe Body Mass Index.

The problem increases as children get older with 35 per cent of girls andalmost a quarter of boys viewing their body as too big by the time they hit 13.

At just 15, 45 per cent of girls and 22 per cent of boys claim they are toofat.

In reality, only ten per cent of girls aged 15 and 15 per cent of boys in thisage group are actually considered obese.

The WHO authors found that feeling too fat was more apparent among girls livingin northern and western Europe.

The report said: Being slim is greatly valued in society, especially forfemales, and the stigmatisation of overweight and obesity appears to beincreasing.

Eating disorder support group BodyWhys said it was important for young peopleto understand negative body images.

A spokesman said: The teenage years are a time of major change, both physicallyand emotionally, which can lead to feelings of self-consciousness and canimpact on a young persons self-esteem, which in turn can impact on body image.

Young people in particular may be influenced by images in the media and inadvertising which present an unrealistic ideal of physical appearance, whichcan lead to a pressure to conform to that unrealistic ideal.

But there are some positive health indicators among Irish children in thereport of more than 200,000 pupils.

Irish children are the second most active youngsters out of the 41 countriessurveyed.

Almost 80 per cent of 11 year olds eat breakfast every day, but this drops offas children get older with just over half of 15-year-old girls and 70 per centof boys eating breakfast.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Health Fears as One in Three Girls Incorrectly Thinks Theyre Overweight - ; Size: Distorted Body Image Is Common
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.