Librarians Library: Comic Book Confidential

By Quinn, Mary Ellen | American Libraries, June-July 2008 | Go to article overview

Librarians Library: Comic Book Confidential


Quinn, Mary Ellen, American Libraries


In 1954, Congressional hearings on juvenile delinquency devoted two days to discussing comic books and the threat they posed to decency and order. In the wake of the hearings more than half of the comic books on newsstands disappeared. "The panic over comic books, falls somewhere between the Red Scare and the frenzy over UFO sightings among the pathologies of postwar America," asserts David Hajdu in The Ten-Cent Plague: The CreatGreat Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Today, graphic literature contin-ues to surge in popularity and even prestige. But is it because comic books still retain a whiff of disreputableness that we use the loftier term "graphic novels" instead? INDEXED, 434 P., $26 FROM FSG (978-0-374-18767-5).

Meet the Millennials

How are library users changing and how can libraries meet their needs? Editors James R. Kennedy, Lisa Vardaman, and Gerard B. McCabe address these questions in Our New Public, A Changing Clientele: Bewildering Issues or New Challenges for Managing Libraries?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A host of experts reflect on Gen Y-- a.k.a. millennials, echo boomers, the Net generation--those vounsr people who are, as one contributor describes them, "technology-obsessed, social and connected, traditional, achievement-oriented, and attention-challenged." Apart from the sheer size of Gen Y, they will all be voting adults in a few years, making it even more important for us to reinvent ourselves in their image.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

INDEXED, 305 P, $45 FROM LIBRARIES UNLIMITED (97B-1-59153-407-0).

Virtual Reality

Virtual reference has evolved from an experiment to a staple of library service, and these two books provide a snap-shot of its implementation at different levels.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Virtual Reference on a Budget: Case Studies, edited by Teresa Dalston and Michael Pullin, examines ways to create virtual reference in a school or public library using low-cost or free software. The book grew out of a doctoral project at the University of North Texas School of Library and Information Sciences and is therefore more academic than a "how we did it at my library" type of guide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Librarians Library: Comic Book Confidential
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.