Thanks to Irish for Democracy Chance

The Journal (Newcastle, England), June 25, 2008 | Go to article overview

Thanks to Irish for Democracy Chance


Byline: DAVID BYRNE

THE rejection of the Lisbon Treaty by the Irish electorate represents much more than just an awkward and ungrateful act on the part of the citizenry of a country which has moved from one of Western Europe's poorest to most prosperous during its membership of the European Union.

Let me put my own cards down. If I had been a voting Irish citizen, which with two Irish grandparents and an Irish passport-holding father I could have been, then I would have voted no and campaigned for a no vote.

At the same time I firmly believe that Europe's future in the 21st Century should be as a democratic federal state based not on nation states but on regions of roughly equal size.

So why am I delighted that the Irish stuck one to Europe's political elites? For two reasons: first, because the whole process surrounding the Lisbon Treaty, and the proposed European constitution before it, has been profoundly undemocratic.

And second, because of the underlying free market agenda of those self-same undemocratic political elites. In relation to the constitution and the treaty, they decided what would be good for us and determined that we would have it whether we wanted it or not.

Given the chance, with the treaty in Ireland and previously with the constitution in France and the Netherlands, we, the citizens of Europe said firmly no. Why on earth did we do that?

It is pretty plain that Europeans as a whole recognise that one of the political objectives of the founders of the union, the prevention of war in Europe, is a thoroughly good thing and we are all for it. In general, we recognise the economic benefits of a free market - customs union, in effect - for goods in the private sector.

And when the pound becomes worth one euro, which given the imbecilic mismanagement of our economy by both major parties since the 1980s to favour speculation over production, won't be long coming, then we Brits will probably accept entry into the Euro zone.

The answer is that we don't trust these people, we don't trust politicians in general and we are deeply suspicious of all the devil in the details. The European Union is so undemocratic that if it applied to join itself it wouldn't be allowed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Thanks to Irish for Democracy Chance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.