Danger of Mercury Fillings Is Very Real; Dental Danger? the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Has Criticised the Use of Amalgam Fillings

Daily Mail (London), July 7, 2008 | Go to article overview
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Danger of Mercury Fillings Is Very Real; Dental Danger? the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Has Criticised the Use of Amalgam Fillings


CONGRATULATIONS on your front page coverage of a serious topic which hasbeen subject to cover-up, controversy and obfuscation for more than 100 years.

Eventually, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could no longeracquiesce to the wishes of the American Dental Association (ADA), and has hadto classify dental amalgam according to its safety and effectiveness.

Acting at last, under duress from a mandate of the U.S. Congress and a lawsuitinitiated by Moms Against Mercury Amalgam and Charles Brown of Consumers forDental Choice, the FDA has admitted the dangers of amalgam.

The problem of amalgam is not theoreticalit is proven fact. I have specialised in the practice of environmental medicinefor about 20 years and I have seen thousands of people suffering from all sortsof diseases from dental mercury, and have seen many recoveries afterdetoxification.

One of the factors in our current health care crisis is that rarely is there anattempt made to identify the cause of a disease. Environmental toxins,including dental mercury, are a major factor in illnesses, most of which havemultiple causes.

Only once in all those years have I heard of a conventional doctor suggestingthat dental amalgam could be a problem, and I have never heard of a suggestionto test for mercury poisoning.

Look at one disease as an example: Alzheimers. Today in the U.S. there areabout 5million sufferers, and that is projected to increase to 16million by2050. There is now dramatic visual proof from the University of Calgary thatmercury is a major cause of this disease.

It is noteworthy that Spanish health advocates will sue the Spanish departmentof health for ignoring the harmful effects of the mercury present in dentalfillings and vaccines.

It will be interesting to see how the HSE and the Irish Dental Association willreact. The greatest irony of all is that our General Medical Services schemewill not pay for the placement of non-amalgam fillings. In other words, thepatient with a medical card can get amalgam placements paid by the State, butmust pay if he wants non-amalgam fillings.

ANTHONY HUGHES, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. The will of the people THE debateregarding the Lisbon Treaty seems to be relentless. It is increasinglyfrustrating to listen to the drama unfolding; the slow, deliberate move towardsa second referendum.

The politicians continue to undermine the electorate by postponing making anannouncement, by refusing to accept that the majority have made a decision, inaccordance with our constitution.

Already, Brian Cowen has failed in carrying out his duty. The message fromBrussels is that ratification should continue in other countries theimplication being that once (if) the 26 countries have ratified Ireland will bein a position where they will feel that one more attempt at ratification of theReform Treaty will be necessary. And we will be asked to vote again.

Brian Cowen should rule this out immediately. Tell them there is nothing he cando. His people have made their decision. They wont shoot the messenger.However, if the messenger doesnt deliver the message, he may not be sent again.

It is frustrating that the opposition i s not pressuring the Taoiseach to carryout his duty. Enda Kenny, if he had any political will, or any respect for thedecision taken by the people, would call for a vote of no confidence in theTaoiseach, and demand a general election.

There have been a number of agreements signed between the Irish people and theother countries of Europe, which declare that all parties agree that newtreaties cannot be adopted without ratification by all countries as required ineach of their constitutions. Ireland has upheld her side of the agreementit is the other EU countries who are letting Europe down by not recognising theagreements previously signed.

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