Hands-Only CPR: Skip the Mouth-to-Mouth Breathing-Experts Now Recommend Hands-Only CPR for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Adults

By Berggoetz, Barb | The Saturday Evening Post, July-August 2008 | Go to article overview

Hands-Only CPR: Skip the Mouth-to-Mouth Breathing-Experts Now Recommend Hands-Only CPR for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Adults


Berggoetz, Barb, The Saturday Evening Post


When someone collapse of sudden cardiac arrest, bystanders and even loved ones are often too scared or unsure of themselves to try to revive them.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The result: Only one quarter to one third of out-of-hospital victims gets any form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Without it, their chances of surviving drop about 10 percent every minute.

The American Heart Association (AHA) hopes its recent recommendation encouraging people to use chest compressions alone will improve their odds--and save more lives.

"Most cardiac arrests, about 75 percent, occur in the victim's own house," said Dr. Michael Sayre, chairman of the association's subcommittee that issued the updated CPR guidelines in April. "If you do this, you may end up saving the life of your wife or husband."

The association's move to approve what it calls hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation--without using mouth-to-mouth breathing--comes after three large studies in 2007 found the method just as effective as conventional CPR when used by bystanders on adult cardiac arrest victims.

Doing hands-only CPR is a good option for people not trained to do conventional CPR or who aren't sure of their ability to give the combination of chest compressions and rescue breathing it requires, according to the association.

"We're asking people to do two things. Call 9-1-1 or send someone else to call. Number two is to press hard and fast in the middle of someone's chest or breast bone," said Sayre, associate professor of emergency medicine at Ohio State University.

Under the guidelines, bystanders are urged to do uninterrupted chest compressions at a rate of 100 per minute on adults who unexpectedly collapse, stop breathing, and are unresponsive. They should press down the chest by 1 1/2 to two inches with the palm of their hand or four fingers, with fingers from both hands locked together and elbows not bent. Compressions should continue until medical help arrives or an automated external defibrillator (AED) is available. As AEDs, which help restore the heart's normal rhythm, become more readily available in homes, neighborhoods, and communities, more lives will be saved.

Many people are afraid to push too hard, fearing they'll crack the victim's ribs or cause another injury.

"It takes a fair amount of force to push as hard as you need to as an adult. You really have to put your back into it," advised Sayre.

"I don't want people to get too hung up on the number (of compressions) or worry about how they're doing it," he added. "Uniformly, victims will trade a couple of broken ribs for being alive."

He just wants more people to try the simpler technique, even if they haven't been trained.

The reason lies in these heart association statistics: Each year, about 310,000 Americans die of cardiac arrest outside hospitals or in emergency departments. Only about six percent stricken outside a hospital survive, although rates differ by location.

"We know that survival is doubled or tripled if victims get some CPR," said Sayre.

He stressed one technique isn't necessarily better than the other, but traditional CPR is recommended for children and for cardiac arrests due to drowning, drug overdose, or carbon monoxide poisoning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hands-Only CPR: Skip the Mouth-to-Mouth Breathing-Experts Now Recommend Hands-Only CPR for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Adults
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.