Adoption Leads Family to Become Missionaries

By Luebke, Nancy | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 16, 2008 | Go to article overview

Adoption Leads Family to Become Missionaries


Luebke, Nancy, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Nancy Luebke Daily Herald Correspondent

Taiwan

Population: 22.9 million

Climate: Maritime subtropical

Languages: Mandarin Chinese, Taiwanese, Hakka

Politics: Multi-party democracy

Economy: Gross domestic product is $379 billion

Faith: More than 75 percent of residents are Buddhist or Taoist. About 2 percent are Christian.

Source: U.S. State Department

Dawn Husnick of Carol Stream became a Christian 11 years ago. Her husband, Mike, followed her into Christianity three years later.

It was the beginning of a journey that has led them to preparations to become missionaries in Taiwan this summer.

When they were looking for a church to call their own, they visited several and eventually joined Glen Ellyn Bible Church five years ago. Their church supports about 10 full-time missionaries now serving in China, Columbia, Germany, Mexico, Turkey and two Chicago neighborhoods. The church also supports the Husnicks' decision to go to Taiwan.

Their interest in Taiwan began after they added Sammy, 5, to their family.

"I felt called to cross cultural missions after we adopted our son, Sammy," Mike said.

Mike said he felt a specific need for a boy from China.

"This was laid on my heart," he said.

The Husnicks, who also have two daughters, prayed about getting a boy from China. This may have seemed like a long shot to many because China has an abundance of unwanted girls for adoption, but boys are a prized commodity and not often up for adoption.

"Doors opened and, through odd circumstances, we ended up on a special-needs Web site and saw Sammy," Dawn said.

Shunzi, or Sammy as he is called now, was in a special-needs orphanage in China because he had a cleft palate. His cleft palate has been surgically repaired since he was adopted by the Husnicks in September 2005, when he was 2. When they went to China to adopt him, something happened. They said they felt like they couldn't go back to their lives.

"We prayed about it and talked to someone at church, who set us up with TEAM," Dawn said.

TEAM is The Evangelical Alliance Mission, a global organization that facilitates missionaries. When the Husnicks started looking at mission locations, they looked at South America and China, but those two opportunities fell through.

TEAM was looking for missionaries for Taiwan, so when the Husnicks get to Taipei in Taiwan, they will work in the TEAM office for the first 18 months while they learn the language and culture.

"We want to work with youth. That is our long time goal," said Mike, who will work part time at a youth camp.

Dawn, who is certified as an ESL teacher, may also teach English while they are in Taipei. She said she will also be traveling to several churches to get the area's youth involved. TEAM has several youth camps for kindergarten through college-age students, churches, Bible study classes and a hospital, so they are willing to do whatever is needed.

"For the first two years, we really have to become that culture to be effective," Mike said.

When the Husnicks found out about TEAM's mission in Taiwan, they talked to church members at Glen Ellyn Bible Church, making their case that they should be missionaries. …

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