Setting and Scoring Your Goals: Goals Are Stated Ambitions; and All Leaders Know They Must Set Them and Follow Them Up till They Are Accomplished. for, Failure to Set Goals Reduces Leadership to Management by Chance and Hunches-A Sure Recipe for Corporate Disaster

By Kumuyi, William F., Dr | New African, July 2008 | Go to article overview

Setting and Scoring Your Goals: Goals Are Stated Ambitions; and All Leaders Know They Must Set Them and Follow Them Up till They Are Accomplished. for, Failure to Set Goals Reduces Leadership to Management by Chance and Hunches-A Sure Recipe for Corporate Disaster


Kumuyi, William F., Dr, New African


Leaders are familiar with goals. They are driven by them. Their change efforts are bent towards accomplishing them. Goals make leadership tick. Periodically, leaders sit down; think hard, size up the future to design goals that will help ensure realisation of the bottom line and fulfilment of the organisation's mission. Goals are stated ambitions; and all leaders know they must set them and follow them up till they are accomplished. For, failure to set goals reduces leadership to management by chance and hunches--a sure recipe for corporate disaster.

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Profits of goal setting

The benefits of goal setting are numerous; but I will outline a few here.

* Definition: Goals help define an organisation's mission and concretise its vision drive. Your organisation's social architecture is partly defined and described by the goals you set and pursue. Your leadership too is rated and characterised according to the goals you accomplish. Simply, people know your organisation's mission and rate what you're doing at the helm by the visions (goals) you pursue. Thus, with neither goals nor vision, your leadership and organisation are essentially without identity.

* Direction: As products of visioning, goals help provide direction for an organisation. The over-arching purpose of leadership is to influence and maintain progressive change. But change is an end-product of realised goals in a particular direction. Thus, if you say you're moving your organisation up, your staff and the public would be itching to know the direction you're heading in. It's your goals that tell them the way. Where no goals exist, there will be no sense of direction, no challenge and nothing to aim at. Consequently, workers become glued to norm and the organisation stagnates.

* Drive: Goals help the workforce know what the organisation is aiming at; and if this knowledge is coupled with appropriate motivation, aggregate productivity invariably improves. Thus, goals indirectly infuse the workforce with the drive for better performances. Leaders looking for an elixir to cure pervasive sloth at the workplace should try goal setting and chasing.

* Diversity: Goals can introduce diversity into an organisation's fossilised work culture. The pursuit of new goals necessarily demands change in programmes and work-style, and the introduction of new production process, programmes, materials, machines and, probably, personnel. Colour and variety are marks of an organisation in sincere pursuit of specific goals.

* Discovery: Goal setting can help reveal the limits of your organisation and your own leadership. The elephant may not know it has no wings until it attempts to fly. Your organisation's strengths and weaknesses come to the fore when you attempt to swim against the tide of norm towards a goal that takes your net-worth to a new height. Leaders who periodically set goals, review and pursue them have a realistic rating of their organisation's capabilities and their own competencies. Those who don't set goals work with a distorted view of whom and what they and their organisations are!

* Development: Your organisation cannot develop without your setting goals and realising them. Development is the cumulative effects of goals set and realised. Leaders of successful world-class organisations are goal-oriented.

* Description: Goals help describe an organisation's successes. In establishments where things happen effortlessly, success is neither celebrated nor appreciated because it's neither sought nor paid for. But where goals are set and their impact measured, the organisation has something to flaunt and the leader has a reason to cheer.

Pitfalls of goal setting

Not all goals are "scored". Both corporate and political leaders are familiar with painful misses, when goals end in mirage. Africa is acquainted with rain clouds of development plans that simply dissolve in the tempestuous wind of transitory governance.

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Setting and Scoring Your Goals: Goals Are Stated Ambitions; and All Leaders Know They Must Set Them and Follow Them Up till They Are Accomplished. for, Failure to Set Goals Reduces Leadership to Management by Chance and Hunches-A Sure Recipe for Corporate Disaster
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