Internet Plays Bigger Role in Divorce Cases; More Turning to Social Networking, Says Lawyer

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), July 29, 2008 | Go to article overview
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Internet Plays Bigger Role in Divorce Cases; More Turning to Social Networking, Says Lawyer


Byline: BY BEN SCHOFIELD

THE internet is playing "an increasingly prominent role in divorce cases," according to Liverpool-based lawyers.

They say people are increasingly turning to social networking sites such as Facebook to vent their anger, take revenge or simply set the record straight.

The most recent example came when Lancashire millionaire businessman Gary Dean posted details of his wife's divorce settlement via his own website in a bid to silence local gossips he claimed had branded him ruthless and greedy.

The pair, who have four children, divorced after 19 years of marriage. Mr Dean paid a lump sum of pounds 3,719,000 plus pounds 15,000 per child per year until the age of 17 years or the end of full time education. He will also pay school fees and Mrs Dean keeps her jewellery, two cars and two private number plates.

Mr Dean, 47, was advised on his divorce and the implications of publishing details on the internet by Liverpool-based lawyers Quinn Barrow.

Managing partner Paul Barrow said: "I was certainly fairly surprised when Gary told me he was planning to put details of his divorce on the website.

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Internet Plays Bigger Role in Divorce Cases; More Turning to Social Networking, Says Lawyer
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