Butcher of Bosnia

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), July 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

Butcher of Bosnia


Byline: The Register-Guard

Justice delayed is not justice denied for long-suffering Bosnian Muslims and Croats. But the arrest of Radovan Karadzic comes 13 years too late to offer any hope of reuniting Bosnia and curbing the nationalist forces that have forced its ethnic partitioning.

Still the importance of the arrest of Bosnian Serbs' notorious wartime leader should not be under estimated. For the beleaguered people of this region, the arrest brings long-overdue closure. As the president of the breakaway Serb region of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Karadzic orchestrated some of the worst atrocities of the Bosnian war.

From 1992 to 1996 he ordered the mass slaughter of Muslims and Croats in Bosnia - the worst massacres in Europe since World War II. In 1995, Karadzic and his military commander, Gen. Ratko Mladic, ordered the execution of nearly 8,000 Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica, which was supposed to have been a safe haven protected by U.N. peacekeepers. Karadzic also masterminded the infamous siege of Sarajevo, which killed at least 10,000 civilians.

Karadzic's arrest is a victory for international justice and the still-emerging International Criminal Court. Even though it took 13 years, his capture sends a chilling message to tyrants such as Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed al-Bashir, whom the ICC recently indicted for genocide in Darfur.

The arrest of Karadzic nudges Serbia closer to membership in the European Union, which already has admitted Slovenia and granted candidate status to other parts of the former Yugoslavia, including Croatia and Macedonia.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Butcher of Bosnia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.