Britain under Water; on the Waterfront: Glasgow's Most Iconic Landmarks and Those of Our Other Major Cities as They Appear after the Devastation Wreaked by the Floodsim.com Game

Daily Mail (London), August 6, 2008 | Go to article overview

Britain under Water; on the Waterfront: Glasgow's Most Iconic Landmarks and Those of Our Other Major Cities as They Appear after the Devastation Wreaked by the Floodsim.com Game


Byline: Maureen Culley

IN a dramatic image of utter devastation, Glasgow's most famous landmarks are reduced to islands in a sea of flood water.

Such recognisable sights as the SECC, the Armadillo, the Glasgow Science Tower and the Clyde Arc bridge - better known as the 'squinty bridge' - are surrounded by water, leaving the city almost unrecognisable.

Thankfully, the picture is not a photograph but a computergenerated scene.

Taken from an online game, the image is designed to show users how flooding could hit parts of the UK without effective flood management and the destruction that could ensue.

The Floodsim.com game puts the player in charge of flood policy decisions for the UK and gives them the opportunity to take a range of measures to protect cities and their residents, from providing sandbags to installing flood barriers.

As the game progresses, it then reveals what happens when serious flooding strikes.

Success in the game, developed by computer company PlayGen, is determined by how many people and how much of the economy is affected by flooding as a result of the player's decisions.

The release of the images is timely - just days ahead of Friday's opening of the Olympic Games, China is presently struggling to cope with flooding after rivers in Anhui and Jiangsu, in the eastern provinces of the country, reached record levels.

Floods there have destroyed tens of thousands of houses, swamped large areas of crops and caused economic losses estimated to be about ?110million.

Now British residents are being offered an apocalyptic insight into what the future could hold if such a disaster were to hit the UK. …

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