Make a Splash in This Job; Careers in Leakage Control If You Have Good Problem-Solving Skills and Don't Mind Getting Dirty, a Career in Leakage Control May Appeal. Michelle Rushton Got Wet to Find out More in Association with Fish4jobs

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), August 7, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Make a Splash in This Job; Careers in Leakage Control If You Have Good Problem-Solving Skills and Don't Mind Getting Dirty, a Career in Leakage Control May Appeal. Michelle Rushton Got Wet to Find out More in Association with Fish4jobs


Byline: Michelle Rushton

What does a career in leakage control involve?

Leakage operatives aim to minimise the amount of water wasted through damaged pipes, by finding leaks in the water distribution network.

They carry out planned surveys and respond to emergencies, making sure the water supply is disrupted as little as possible. There is often no visible sign of a leak, so one of their main tasks it to use specialist equipment to examine water flowing in and out of an area, pinpointing any leaks.

Work also includes inspecting customers' water supply, monitoring leakage, attaching leakage detection equipment to pipes and measuring water pressure and flow.

What training do you need?

Employers ask for a good standard of education and you may have an advantage with some GCSEs or similar qualifications.

It is also useful to have previous experience or qualifications in construction, plumbing, building services engineering or plant maintenance.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship scheme, for which you would need four GCSEs (A-C), including maths, English, and another relevant subject such as science, engineering or design and technology.

Training would combine on-the-job experience and the chance to gain NVQ Level 2 in Leakage Detection, NVQ Level 2 Water Distribution Control, NVQ Level 3 Leakage Control or NVQ Level 3 Maintaining Water Supply Network.

The NVQ includes work-based assessments as well as study at a local college to gain a technical certificate such as the City & Guilds Level 2 and 3 Certificates in Water Engineering (Leakage).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Make a Splash in This Job; Careers in Leakage Control If You Have Good Problem-Solving Skills and Don't Mind Getting Dirty, a Career in Leakage Control May Appeal. Michelle Rushton Got Wet to Find out More in Association with Fish4jobs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?