Freedoms

By Fried, James | Business Credit, July-August 2008 | Go to article overview

Freedoms


Fried, James, Business Credit


Not too long ago, I had the opportunity to read a speech that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered to the United States Congress on January 6, 1941. In that speech, often described as the Four Freedoms Address, FDR outlined his vision for the future of civilization and the four freedoms he saw as essential to us. FDR's Four Freedoms are: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Religion, Freedom from Want and Freedom from Fear.

This speech inspired me to stop and consider a couple of questions. What freedoms are most essential to our association, and what rights are so fundamental to our profession that they must be guarded and protected?

Let me share my thoughts with you:

Freedom of association is essential. The freedom to form, join and support an organization of your choice is essential to everyone in a free society, and to everyone reading this commentary. I credit much of my professional success to my association, NACM. Without the educational and professional support I receive from NACM, I would not lead a successful credit career.

My association with NACM Credit Groups has made me a better credit professional and has saved my company money. I learned how my peers deal with difficult customers, and I've learned techniques to better communicate with my company's management. I have also fostered a network of professional contacts who continue to support me. Like my Credit Group experience, my association with my local Affiliate has made me a stronger, more successful credit professional and, therefore, an important player in my company. The tools and services, like open access to credit reports and credit groups, help me make better credit decisions on behalf of the my company.

My association with the National Board has pushed me to reach new heights. It's made me a better visionary and taught me to think critically about issues important and relevant to the future of our association. It's through my association with NACM, that I have the privilege to be writing this commentary and to, in turn, be associated with all of you.

Freedom to lobby Congress for sound public policies, laws and regulations is another critical freedom. At the very core of NACM is the mission to monitor legislation at the federal level.

Freedom of a flee market economy is critical to us as professionals. A free market is a market in which the prices of goods and services are arranged completely by the mutual consent of sellers and buyers. …

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