Trying Hard to Be Open: Janet Reno Says Justice Department Attempting to Keep Promise for More Public Disclosure

By Hernandez, Debra Gersh | Editor & Publisher, May 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

Trying Hard to Be Open: Janet Reno Says Justice Department Attempting to Keep Promise for More Public Disclosure


Hernandez, Debra Gersh, Editor & Publisher


The Justice Department is trying every day to keep its promises for a more open government, with disclosure as the norm, according to Attorney General Janet Reno.

"Too many Americans mistrust their government," Reno said. "And unnecessary government secrecy feeds this mistrust.

"What makes this country unique is its commitment to being open, to holding its leaders accountable," she said during a speech at the American Society of Newspaper Editors convention in Washington.

Speaking during the week that marked the one-year anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, Reno noted that while "our thoughts turn to the threat of terrorism - in our own country and around the world - it is so important that we not retreat from that principle, that we not give in to assaults on our democratic values.

It is a time when we need to renew and invigorate our commitment to open government," Reno said.

In 1975, the Department of justice received 30,000 Freedom of Information Act requests, the attorney general said. In just 20 years, that figure sky-rocketed to 125,000 FoIA and Privacy Act requests, which were being handled by the equivalent of 617 people working full time at a cost of over $35 million a year.

"I know full well that a working reporter doesn't care how many requests we get or how much it costs to process them. I understand that," Reno said. What you care about is when you are going to get your questions answered. That's the challenge, one that demands real solutions."

Among the DoJ's progress, Reno cited a significant reduction in FolA request backlogs for most of the DoJ's sub-parts; a decline in backlogs at other agencies, such as Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Bureau of Prisons and U.S. attorneys' offices; the implementation of expedited FolA requests for information that is particularly newsworthy; a simple, easy. to retrieve document from the press office that doesn't go into the FoIA system; the release of information about DoJ attorney misconduct without FolA requests; the encouragement of discretionary release by other agencies and a reevaluation of FoIA forms and formats; and FoIA performance has become part of relevant DoJ employees' job descriptions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trying Hard to Be Open: Janet Reno Says Justice Department Attempting to Keep Promise for More Public Disclosure
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.