Your Life: Should Graphic Pro-Life Sites Be BANNED? HEALTH Sites Using Pictures of Aborted Foetuses to Discourage Terminations Have Come under Fire. as New Research Claims Abortions Don't Risk Mental Health, Two Women Discuss a Ban

The Mirror (London, England), August 20, 2008 | Go to article overview

Your Life: Should Graphic Pro-Life Sites Be BANNED? HEALTH Sites Using Pictures of Aborted Foetuses to Discourage Terminations Have Come under Fire. as New Research Claims Abortions Don't Risk Mental Health, Two Women Discuss a Ban


Byline: By Monica Cafferky

YES! They are too horrific

Mum-of one Lora Bishop, 28, from Eastbourne, Sussex, recently had an abortion.

I had my abortion on March 12 this year.

My heart wanted to keep my baby but I'd split from the father and I knew he didn't want the pregnancy to go ahead.

So, feeling trapped, I had the termination and every day since my decision has haunted me.

Having the abortion was my first mistake. Looking at pro-life websites on the internet was my second.

Initially, I went on the sites to try and feel better about what I'd done.

I was looking for photographs of a 12-week foetus, the stage at which I had the abortion, in the hope that it wouldn't look like a baby yet, just cells.

I knew in my heart, though, that a 12-week foetus isn't just cells but is formed and looks very human. I realised then that I'd made a big mistake and I began seeking more pictures of aborted foetuses - torturing myself.

I doubt I am the only woman to do this after a termination.

These sites are sickening enough to the average viewer, but to a woman who has had a termination she didn't want they are soul-destroying.

It broke my heart to let my unborn child go. No woman ever wants to do this but there can be many factors at play which could include: an abusive relationship with the child's father, lack of money, lack of space, illness, mental health issues, birth deformity and the wellbeing of any other children.

I believe viewing these sites will only make a woman's decision harder and probably jeopardise her mental health.

But they will not, I suspect, make her change her mind about having an abortion.

It's not an overstatement for me to say that looking at pro-life websites with graphic images of aborted foetuses has made coping with my abortion even harder.

Before looking at them, I was dealing with it. I had to cope to be able to look after my daughter, who at three years-old is still just a baby herself.

But I found the images shocking and disturbing.

No one should have to look at such disturbing photographs, I believe they are too shocking and awful to be in the public domain.

I now wish very much that I was stronger and it could have been different.

But my baby was getting bigger every day and I had to make a quick decision.

It's done now. I can't go back. Nor can I get the images of aborted foetuses I have seen on these sites out of my head.

No one has the right to try and make me, or any other woman who has had an abortion, feel terrible and evil. …

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