Beautiful Belize

By Motavalli, Jim | E Magazine, May-June 1996 | Go to article overview

Beautiful Belize


Motavalli, Jim, E Magazine


This Tiny Country Retains Much Of Its Natural Charm

It is possible to stand in the midst of a rainforest in Belize, surrounded by dripping trees and the cries of howler monkeys, and think that you're in a particularly unspoiled corner of Costa Rica. Or maybe Brazil, before that country's air was choked with smoke from burning trees and the ugly scars of clear-cuts. Possibly because of its small population of 211,000 scattered among 8,876 square miles of coastline, mountains and dense forests, Belize has escaped the headlong development that has marred so much of Latin America's natural beauty. Even its largest metropolis, Belize City, is home to no more than 60,000 people.

Like Costa Rica, Belize is an ecotraveler's dream destination because so much of it is unspoiled by deforestation (50 percent of the original rainforests remain) and high-volume tourist construction. Sandwiched between Mexico and Guatemala, English-speaking Belize resembles neither. Belize's coast is much as it was in its 19th-century incarnation as British Honduras - pristine beaches and coral reefs dotted with small fishing villages, and river inlets crowded with mangrove trees. Jutting down from the Yucatan Peninsula and descending almost to the Guatemalan border are a sprinkling of jewel-like cayes with picturesque names like Half Moon, Ambergris and Laughing Bird. Some of the smaller, uninhabitated cayes are no more than a few acres of sand and palm trees, resembling the classic desert island of cartoon fame.

E spent a week in Belize on board the Temptress, a 174-foot U.S.-built cabin cruiser outfitted to take 62 passengers on nature cruises along the coast south of Belize City. The city itself looks bruised and battered by the assault of too many hurricanes; even its newer buildings are weathered. Our first encounter with the real Belize occurred on a sidetrip into the gorgeous Southern Lagoon, reached through the bar of the Manatee River (so named because it is home to the world's largest congregation of them). Our destination was the immense Ben Lomond Cave, whose dignified stalagtited caverns are home to thousands of screeching fruit-eating bats. Along the way, our taciturn guide, John, explained the uses of the local plants, from the calabash tree (good for coughs) to the gnarly Waha, whose wood formed straps on native dugout canoes.

On the first of several river tours undertaken aboard Zodiac rafts, we explored the mouth of central Belize's Sittee River, near the country's Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, home to elusive jaguars. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beautiful Belize
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.