Michelle Obama Stresses Barack's Working Class Credentials in Speech; INTERNATIONAL

The Birmingham Post (England), August 27, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Michelle Obama Stresses Barack's Working Class Credentials in Speech; INTERNATIONAL


Democrat Barack Obama offers "new hope" for America and would make an "extraordinary president", his wife and party leaders said yesterday.

Michelle Obama used stories from her life to emphasise her husband's American values and that he understood what the United States needs - despite his exotic name.

US Senator Edward Kennedy, the sole surviving son of America's most celebrated political dynasty, said the 47-year-old Illinois senator offered "new hope" and America would "scale the heights" under Obama's leadership.

Liberal heavyweight Mr Kennedy, diagnosed with a malignant brain tumour in May, said "nothing, nothing" was going to keep him from the convention.

But the opening night of the Democratic National Convention lacked criticism of President George Bush or Obama's Republican rival John McCain. It was a soft introduction to Obama, his life, values, and aims.

In a prime-time television address, carried live by US networks, Mrs Obama, 44, said she believed her husband would be "an extraordinary president".

She used her most high profile speech to expose details of Obama's personal story and to introduce the man she married to America.

"What struck me when I first met Barack was even though he had this funny name, and had grown up across the continent in Hawaii, his family was so much like mine," she said.

Mrs Obama recalled her husband carefully driving her home from hospital after the birth of her first daughter, Malia, and that he was determined to give her "something he never had, the affirming embrace of a father's love".

Both Malia, 10 and Sasha, seven, joined their mother on the stage.

Mrs Obama emphasised her husband, who has struggled to attract support from working class Americans, was raised by working class grandparents; she told voters focused on the troubled economy his family had struggled to pay bills; and she said their families had the same values, a belief in truth and honesty, and "you can make it if you try".

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Michelle Obama Stresses Barack's Working Class Credentials in Speech; INTERNATIONAL
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?