Getting It Right First Time

By Miles, Louella | Marketing, April 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

Getting It Right First Time


Miles, Louella, Marketing


Undertaking market research for new product development is arcane, according to Bob Dance, research operations director at Q1 International Research. "It's conceptual until you commit money to it and you can commit large sums and get absolutely nowhere," he says. "Clients find it difficult putting money in at one end of a project with no guarantee of getting it out at the other."

If they don't invest in NPD research, what are their options? They might go ahead on gut feelings, or because an idea has met with departmental or familial approval and they might be right- but the alternative isn't worth thinking about.

Market researchers can be called in before, during or after a project, though the same firm won't necessarily see the project through. "You'd think it makes sense for someone to take it all the way through," says Dance, "but people pigeon-hole you, and different people pigeon-hole you differently."

The two most evident trends in this area are an upsurge in NPD work and a growing emphasis on secrecy. Many consultancies talk of clients stressing the confidentiality clauses in contracts and warning them off talking about projects in the press.

It is still an area that generates extraordinary enthusiasm from those who work in it. Angela Humphries, a director of Verve, the Research Business's youth consultancy, sums it up: "I enjoy it because it's exciting, sometimes involving a small tweak to a product and at others needing something quite revolutionary."

She claims that clients are visiting her earlier in the NPD process, often instigating 'needs studies' to look at what drives people. One client appeared recently with a concept it was about to launch, but which Humphries worried was 'me-too-ish'.

"So we stepped back, thought about all the other opportunities and then developed, with a design company, some great concepts [which had been brainstormed with the clients] to explore other areas of opportunity," she explains.

The result, which will soon appear on the market, was achieved with client co-operation throughout. "In this particular instance, the client welcomed being told that the original idea was not a goer," says Humphries. "Sometimes, however, you are treading on eggshells."

Lack of knowledge in different sectors means companies must trawl for information wherever available. At Young Direction, a division of Crucible Research, managing director Jane Almey offers marketers and researchers 'kids and teens' days.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Getting It Right First Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.