Risk Management Education Goes Global

By Head, George L. | Risk Management, June 1996 | Go to article overview

Risk Management Education Goes Global


Head, George L., Risk Management


Last year, people in more than 30 countries studied the Insurance Institute of America's (IIA) Associate in Risk Management (ARM) program and took one or more of the three ARM examinations. Thanks in part to the support the ARM program has received from RIMS since its development in 1965, it is growing not only in numbers---more than 17,000 people now have earned the designation but also in influence and reputation within the international risk management community.

As a result of several agreements IIA has signed recently with educators in France, Australia and Germany, the ARM program is becoming more readily available and meaningful in those countries.

The French ARM program, with more than 40 participants, is the largest. The first class of 12 French ARMs received their designations and diplomas in Strasbourg in January. The diplomas were presented by Dr. Donald R. Oakes, IIA senior vice president, at the annual meeting of the Association pour le Management des Risques et des Assurances de l'Entreprise (AMRAE). The French ARM program was developed by IIA in cooperation with AMRAE and the Centre National de Prevention et de Protection (CNPP).

Jean-Paul Louisot, a French academic with extensive risk management experience, has translated the ARM texts and course guides--ARM 54, Essentials of Risk Management, ARM 55, Essentials of Risk Control and ARM 56, Essentials of Risk Financing--into French. He simultaneously adapted the material to meet the needs of the European market. AMRAE and CNPP publish and distribute the French texts and course guides under an agreement with HA. Classes are offered in Paris and Bordeaux.

IIA is responsible for developing and grading the French-language ARM exams, with advice and assistance from Mr. Louisot and other representatives of AMRAE and CNPP. Bilingual graders who hold the ARM designation and are familiar with risk management practices in the United States and France grade the French-language examinations as well as those given in English. In this way, we eliminate the need and potential difficulties of translating students' answers, and all ARM exams are graded to a uniform standard.

IIA also has worked with the Australian Risk and Insurance Management Association (ARIMA), which has determined that the ARM program can meet the educational needs of Australian risk managers with only modest changes. ARIMA has the opportunity to identify topics that are not applicable to the Australian situation--especially in the area of risk financing--and prepare supplementary readings to replace those topics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Risk Management Education Goes Global
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.