'Swansea's Community Feel Is the Reason It Continues to Draw Students' A UNIVERSITY VIEW EDUCATION WALES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), August 28, 2008 | Go to article overview

'Swansea's Community Feel Is the Reason It Continues to Draw Students' A UNIVERSITY VIEW EDUCATION WALES


Byline: James Houston

THE summer is always an interesting period for student officers as the university quietens down and our members return home for their break. It is often a period of transition, preparation, but most crucially, reflection.

We certainly have a lot to reflect upon this year; a year which has seen Swansea once again aiming to achieve a place on the shortlist for the UK's Best Student Experience.

I truly believe that Swansea students are not only excelling academically, but they are by far some of the most active and friendly university students in the country.

When we reflect upon our union's successes this year, we can certainly say that we have achieved, but the credit must go to our students.

Last month's graduation ceremonies held on campus gave us all a fantastic opportunity to really celebrate our students' time at university and their successes.

As our students milled around campus with their friends and relatives, they reminisced about where they had been taught, where they had revised for exams, and often where they had socialised.

One of the highlights for me was the degree ceremonies of our School of Medicine and School of Health Science graduates, many of whom have worked extraordinarily hard both in study and on placements.

When the university's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Richard Davies, asked many where their next direction in life would be, many could not contain their excitement as they recounted their future plans.

It is a credit to our graduates, but most importantly the university staff, that such a fantastically enthused group of men and women graduated this year who, whilst understandably anxious about their next step, are clearly excited about their future.

One of our targets in the past academic year has been to increase our student involvement and relations within our community.

While environmental and social projects have encouraged our students to become better stewards of their community, it has been, above all, our societies and sports clubs which have made the real impact.

Discovery Student Volunteering, based at the university, has always been a stalwart of our students, as they work tirelessly alongside vulnerable adults, young people, children and those with disabilities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Swansea's Community Feel Is the Reason It Continues to Draw Students' A UNIVERSITY VIEW EDUCATION WALES
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.