TUESDAY UPDATE: 'E&P' Blogs the Democratic Convention! Return Here for Reports from Our Pair in Denver

Editor & Publisher, August 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

TUESDAY UPDATE: 'E&P' Blogs the Democratic Convention! Return Here for Reports from Our Pair in Denver


Starting now, E&P will be providing items and reports from Denver, where the Democrats are meeting all week to officially nominate the Obama-Biden team.

The pieces will be provided by one of our current columnists, Maegan Carberry, and Charles Geraci, a former intern here who covered the 2004 GOP convention in New York. Geraci now works for The Herald Journal in Logan, Utah, a daily paper, and is one of 50 correspondents affiliated with MTV this election year as part of its "Choose or Lose" team.

So here are the first postings. Return for more later, updated from the top.

*TUESDAY 1 PM ET: Twenty-four hours into the DNC, I've been getting the lay of the land (which has been pretty interesting). It's one of those limited-resources situations where there's a plethora of political enthusiasts representing their various causes, and because you're a liberal you have to pay attention to them.

For example, I experienced some progressive guilt yesterday when I went to Walgreens to buy some toothpaste and when I came out, I was immediately sandwiched between a help-the-homeless guy and an immigrants rights activist. I didn't know whose pamphlet to take or who to listen to, and I really just wanted to get home to finish my writing. I wound up nodding and pretending to chase after the guys riding around the 16th Street Mall in an "Impeach Bush" rickshaw.

And let's talk about rickshaws. My previous experience with them consisted of that one episode of "Seinfeld" when Kramer buys one to great disaster. Today, though, after walking for an hour to pick up my tickets to this week's various parties, it was hot and I was sweating so badly that I commissioned a rickshaw driver. I've always thought it was a little weird to be pulled in a person-drawn contraption and I felt very ackward chit-chatting with my driver while I watched him peddle away. (Although I was getting quite a workout trying to hang on to my laptop and grip the safety bar so as not to fall out on a particularly steep incline en route to the convention center!)

The streets were just lulling to action this morning on my walk. Lot of Obama buttons and Yosi's HOPE shirts. Some enthusiastic Nader supporters protesting in a park.

My pal, the brilliant Max and the Marginalized rocker-blogger, Max Bernstein, and I are stationed centrally in a lovely studio pad we found on Craigslist. -- Maegan Carberry

*

MONDAY 10:05 PM ET: Mike Littwin says he's working on "surviving" the Democratic National Convention in Denver. The lead political columnist for the Rocky Mountain News has been busy the last few days -- interviewing Barack Obama, attending a protest in Denver and, of course, writing his columns. "I'm working on surviving," he told E&P Monday. "That's the main thing I'm working on." In a rather snarky column that ran in Monday's edition of the newspaper, Littwin found some humor in the over-hyped Sunday protests in Denver. "It was sort of funny to watch the city and the newspaper, which I think overreacted to the possibility of drama on the streets," Littwin said. In Monday's column, Littwin wrote of the protest he attended, "This was the anti-confrontation confrontation. It was more like duty at Coors Field. You arrest a few drunks and sit back and watch the [baseball] game. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TUESDAY UPDATE: 'E&P' Blogs the Democratic Convention! Return Here for Reports from Our Pair in Denver
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.