Insurers Tell Parkinsons Man Youre Not Ill Enough to Claim; George Forsythe: I Will Be Persistent

Daily Mail (London), September 4, 2008 | Go to article overview

Insurers Tell Parkinsons Man Youre Not Ill Enough to Claim; George Forsythe: I Will Be Persistent


Byline: YVONNE TARLETON

A MAN who developed Parkinsons disease is being denied compensation from his life insurance company until his condition worsens.

George Forsythe, 56, took out a serious illness policy over ten years ago with Canada Life.

He was diagnosed with the degenerative Parkinsons disease three years ago, and put in a claim with the company.

But, to his disgust, after paying his policy for eight years prior to his diagnosis, he has been told that he is not eligible for compensation until he reaches latter stage Parkinsons a definition which he says was introduced to his policy after he was diagnosed with the incurable disease.

Mr Forsythe, who lives in Sallynoggin in Dublin and is married with two children, has had to continue paying his premium to Canada Life in the hope that he will eventually receive compensation, despite the fact that he feels he has been unfairly treated.

Speaking to the Liveline radio programme yesterday, he said: They said I didnt need permanent assistance.

What they have is this definition which incidentally they changed the heading on halfway through my time to latter stage Parkinsons.

When they originally sent me out the definition it just said Parkinsons disease. They changed the heading about a year into the claim.

Theyre treating these policies like life policies that you have to be dead to collect it.

Its no good to you when youre dead. Its not a life policy I have, its a serious illness policy. I have to continue to pay the premiums in the hope that they will pay out at some stage.

When you take out these policies you dont take them knowing that youre going to use them. …

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