Mental Health Mustn't Be 'Cinderella' Service in New NHS Structure; THE PROFESSIONALS

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Mental Health Mustn't Be 'Cinderella' Service in New NHS Structure; THE PROFESSIONALS


Byline: Mike Ponton

THE saying "out of sight, out of mind" is a phrase recently quoted to describe the under-reported and often ignored issue of mental health.

While improvements have taken place in recent times, historically mental health services have rarely taken the spotlight, earning them the label of "Cinderella" services.

This is why the Welsh NHS Confederation welcomes the debate sparked by Professor Michael Williams' report on the future of mental health services in Wales and the Health Minister's stated intention to take a close look at their future.

A similar debate is going on in England, and a discussion paper from the Future Vision Coalition puts forward a positive and radical agenda for changing the way we think about mental health services.

The coalition, made up from the NHS Confederation's mental health network and several national mental health organisations, highlights three main aims for the future of mental health services, which are as relevant here as they are across the border.

Firstly, we must deal with the persistent challenges we face in overcoming deep-seated, often unconscious, public attitudes of fear and stigmatisation of mental illness.

Secondly, care for people affected by mental ill-health must take into account not only their health needs, but also their "whole-life outcomes" - the wider social factors that can impact on our mental wellbeing, such as housing and education.

The third aim is to improve the mental health of the whole population by improving public understanding, promoting positive mental health and creating conditions conducive to good mental health.

These are far-reaching and ambitious aims. So how can we shape our mental health policy in Wales in order to achieve them?

The Future Vision Coalition report outlines the changes that need to happen to enable those experiencing mental health problems to enjoy equal opportunities for a fulfilling life.

Above all, mental health should not be seen exclusively as a health and social services issue.

We must widen our focus from addressing the purely clinical needs of mental health service users.

The absence of symptoms does not lead to a fulfilling life if, for example, an employer is put off hiring someone because they have experienced mental health problems in the past. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mental Health Mustn't Be 'Cinderella' Service in New NHS Structure; THE PROFESSIONALS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.