Crime and Reformation: An Outspoken State Supreme Court Judge as Become the Darling of Ardent Conservatives

By Gahr, Evan | Insight on the News, July 15, 1996 | Go to article overview

Crime and Reformation: An Outspoken State Supreme Court Judge as Become the Darling of Ardent Conservatives


Gahr, Evan, Insight on the News


An outspoken state Supreme Court judge has become the darling of ardent conservatives.

Harold Rothwax is a rare bird. Known as the "Prince of Darkness" for his no-nonsense courtroom demeanor, the 65-year-old New York State Supreme Court judge has won the hearts of conservatives at a time when they routinely for dispensing "junk justice." His recent book, Guilty: The Collapse of Criminal Justice, a scathing critique published in the wake of the O.J. Simpson trial, has tilted the political zeitgeist toward judicial reform.

"The public line from the members of the bar is that the delays and the extent to which the guilty go free are the price we pay for freedom," says former U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr. "That's rubbish!"

But columnist Nat Hentoff, a civil libertarian who writes frequently on legal issues, believes Rothwax has "added to the feeling around the nation that `technicalities' get in the way of [fighting] crime - technicalities like the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth amendments and all those subversive notions."

Another reason Rothwax's voice may be especially compelling: his decidedly liberal background. A Columbia Law School graduate, he began his career as a defense attorney for the Legal Aid Society and belonged to the American Civil Liberties Union until his 1971 appointment to the criminal court bench. "I believed then [but] I don't believe any longer that the process is a rational process," he tells Insight. "When I became a judge, I realized as part of my daily work I was required to release guilty people for no good reason!"

Rothwax blames that unhappy circumstance on a long list of Supreme Court decisions dating to the 1960s that he contends have tied the hands of prosecutors and police, making justice "a lottery" in which defendants get a "sporting chance" to avoid the law.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Crime and Reformation: An Outspoken State Supreme Court Judge as Become the Darling of Ardent Conservatives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.