Museums' Visitor Numbers Hit Culture Year Record; Galleries Ready to Build on O8 Success

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), September 25, 2008 | Go to article overview

Museums' Visitor Numbers Hit Culture Year Record; Galleries Ready to Build on O8 Success


Byline: BY RICHARD DOWN Daily Post Staff

NATIONAL Museums Liverpool has recorded the highest number of visitors in its history.

The seven free museums and galleries notched up 360,000 visitors in July, 2008, and another 370,000 in August, 2008.

This means that, in these two months, the only group of national museums in England outside London, had more visitors than in the whole of 2000 - 2001.

A total of 1.41m visitors went to National Museums Liverpool between April and August, 2008, a 39% increase on the same period in 2007.

NML director Dr David Fleming said: "These are our biggest visitor figures since records began. Every day, you can virtually guarantee the galleries will be heaving with people.

"Obviously, Liverpool being European Capital of Culture has helped boost the figures, but the trend has been upwards for seven years.

People have definitely got the message that National Museums Liverpool offers variety, quality and excitement."

The busiest venue was the Merseyside Maritime Museum, which includes the International Slavery Museum. More than 160,000 people visited in July alone.

The World Museum Liverpool welcomed just under 200,000 visitors, and more than half of them visited the blockbuster music exhibition, The Beat Goes On.

The Walker Art Gallery is building on its huge reputation, and by the end of the year is expected to reach its highest visitor figures ever.

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Museums' Visitor Numbers Hit Culture Year Record; Galleries Ready to Build on O8 Success
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