The Morality of Business

By Versi, Anver | African Business, July-August 1996 | Go to article overview

The Morality of Business


Versi, Anver, African Business


In this issue, we publish an inspiring story on how a South African hotel chain, not wishing to create "an island of opulence in a sea of poverty," involved the impoverished local community in the construction and running of a new game lodge.

The outcome of this socio-economic experiment has been both startling and spectacular. The local community, made up largely of down at heel cattle herders and struggling farmers, seized the half chance they were offered with both hands. They were provided with an opportunity to learn new skills: Carpentry, brick-laying, hydroponics (growing vegetables in water), plumbing and so on. They learnt amazingly quickly.

The new buzz of economic activity that was thus created awoke nascent entrepreneurial talent. One man quickly graduated from selling everyday items from the boot of his ramshackle car into a shopkeeper; another taught himself brick-making and is now busy supplying metropolitan areas; and farmers producing horticultural products using hydroponics, are now selling their products to supermarkets in distant cities.

The once impoverished area is now a thriving, humming little village. Tourists are welcomed with more than common courtesy. The game lodge, unlike many others throughout Africa, is not regarded as an alien, forbidden and forbidding structure; it is the proud centrepiece of the village. It was made by the villagers and it thus "belongs" to them. It has changed their lives for the better.

Conservationists and environmentalists will have very little to do in this area; the local people, you can bet your last dollar, will protect the flora and fauna with their lives if necessary.

This type of community-based approach to tourism development, which we are pleased to note is spreading in Southern Africa, has done more for conservation than all the expensive educational campaigns that have been mounted throughout the continent, often by foreign based animal protection societies. It works because local people are fully involved in the project, not excluded; it works because there is no conflict between the rights of animals and humans; it works because the fruits of the enterprise go to the local people, not smartly suited strangers. It works because the relationship between capital and labour is right, just and moral.

Morality is a word that is not particularly popular among business circles, especially the giant multinationals. They prefer to hear "demand and supply", "competitive advantage", "unit labour costs" and other such terms which attempt to divorce production from the realm of human value systems.

Regaining human values

But "morality" is a word that is assuming greater significance with each passing day in the economic activities of African countries. Already, the morality of economic relations has become the banner under which the new political generals are marshalling their troops in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Kenya. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Morality of Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.