Unforgettable 'Host'; Face to Face with Ethnic Animosity

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

Unforgettable 'Host'; Face to Face with Ethnic Animosity


Byline: Jayne Blanchard, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

You may think been there, done that with Host and Guest. However, six years and recent events in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia have only enhanced the intensity and artistry of one of Synetic Theater's signature pieces.

Director Paata Tsikurishvili, a native of Georgia, originally intended to start the fall season with an adaptation of the silent horror film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. Real horror supplanted the cinematic kind as Russia exercised military might in Georgia during the summer, and Mr. Tsikurishvili, along with his actor and choreographer wife Irina, decided that something that speaks to the legacy of ethnic hatred would be more fitting.

Not that previous incarnations of Host and Guest have been anything but gripping. However, this production has renewed vigor and a stately beauty that just gives you the shivers. Credit company members Ben Cunis and Dan Istrate - playing hunter-warriors who meet by chance in the forest and befriend each other - for infusing graceful swiftness and immediacy to the work. The score, by Konstantine Lortkipanidze, a mix of Georgian folk tunes and original music, also blooms in your brain in a way never felt before.

Host and Guest was adapted in 2002 by Roland Reed from an epic poem by Vazha Pshavela that was written at the turn of the 20th century and has become a classic in the Georgian literary canon. The poem (its synopsis appears in the program, and it's advisable to arrive early enough to read it so you won't get so caught up in the action that you might miss the poem's subtleties) centers on two men, the Muslim Joqola (Mr. Istrate) and the Christian Zviadauri (Mr. Cunis). The two lay down their weapons so they both may get a drink of water, and from that simple act, a tragically short-lived friendship evolves.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unforgettable 'Host'; Face to Face with Ethnic Animosity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.