Take a Ride for Wildlife: Conservation Is on the Go as Environmental License Plates Decorate American Autos

By Long, Cynthia | Insight on the News, September 2, 1996 | Go to article overview

Take a Ride for Wildlife: Conservation Is on the Go as Environmental License Plates Decorate American Autos


Long, Cynthia, Insight on the News


Conservation is on the go as environmental license plates decorate American autos.

California pioneered the trend in 1970 with its Environmental License Plate Fund, which garnered revenue from "vanity" plates. More recently, the state introduced its popular "image" plate -- a scene from Yosemite National Park -- that has raised millions of dollars to help save the peregrine falcon, bighorn sheep and other species.

From Maine to Arizona and Florida to Utah, more than half of the states now (or soon will) offer motorists the opportunity to order environmental "cause" plates -- license plates that celebrate nature and raise money for its preservation.

Maryland's environmental plate, with an image of the great blue heron stamped on recycled aluminum, was first issued in 1990. Each plate costs $20, of which $12 goes to the Chesapeake Bay Dust, a nonprofit organization, and the rest to the state Motor Vehicle Administration for manufacturing and distribution costs. Hailed as one of the most successful such fund-raising efforts in the country, Maryland's plate has delivered $6.2 million to the trust for programs such as river and stream clean-ups, tree and marsh grass plantings and habitat restorations.

While costs and procedures governing specialty plates vary from state to state, some issue them on an ad hoc basis, responding to petitions by specific groups. In Virginia, for example, organizations with 350 pre-paid applications can petition the General Assembly for personalized plates. As a result, Virginia has the most specialty plates in the country -- 200, of which six benefit environmental groups.

In fact, Virginia's environmental plates were a response to a budget crisis at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, or VDGIF, which received $5 million less than it had requested from the state in 1991. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Take a Ride for Wildlife: Conservation Is on the Go as Environmental License Plates Decorate American Autos
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.