Complex Query Processing on Web Graph: A Social Network Perspective

By Mitra, Susanta; Bagchi, Aditya et al. | Journal of Digital Information Management, February 2008 | Go to article overview

Complex Query Processing on Web Graph: A Social Network Perspective


Mitra, Susanta, Bagchi, Aditya, Bandyopadhyay, A. K., Journal of Digital Information Management


ABSTRACT: A social network represents a social community as a directed graph. Communication on the Web has given rise to social network formation like, Web Community, Referral System etc. An earlier effort has proposed a data model for such Web-based social network. Present paper discusses the relevant index structures for processing queries on a social network schema based upon the proposed data model. The paper has also provided evaluation of the structural operators proposed in the data model and discussed their efficacy with query examples.

Categories and Subject Descriptors

E.1 [Data Structures]; Graphs and networks E.4 [Coding and Information Theory]; Data compaction and compression] H3.4 [Systems and software]; Information networks

General Terms

Web graphs, Social networking, Data compression

Keywords: Web Graph, Social Network, Query Processing, XB-tree, Operator Evaluation

1. Introduction

A social network is a social structure between actors (individuals, organization or other social entities) and indicates the ways in which they are connected through various social relationships like friendships, kinships, professional, academic etc. Some of the notable structural properties of a social network are connectedness between actors, reachability between a source and a target actor, reciprocity or pair-wise connection between actors with bi-directional links, centrality of actors or the important actors having high degree or more connections and finally the division of actors into sub-structures, like cliques or stronglyconnected components. The division of actors into strongly-connected components can be a very important factor for understanding a social structure, particularly the degree of cohesiveness in a community.

The formal representation of this pattern of relationships is a directed graph or digraph. In this graph, each member of a social community (people or other entities embedded in a social context) is considered as a node and communication (collaboration, interaction or influence) from one member of the community to another member is represented by a directed edge. In seventies Leinhardt first proposed the idea of representing a social community by a digraph [8]. A graph representing a social network has certain basic structural properties, which distinguishes it from other type of networks or graphs. The number of nodes in a social network can be very small representing a circle of friends or very large representing a Web community.

The diverse and distributed nature of World-Wide-Web has given rise to variety of research into the Web's link structure ranging from graph-theoretic studies (connectivity, reachability etc.) to community mining (like, discovering strongly connected structural components etc.). Recently, Web has played a major role in the formation of communities (Cyber-communities or Web communities) where members or people from different parts of the globe can join the community for common interest. Thus Web has become a good source of social networks. Structural similarities of Web with a social network help in studying different sociological behaviors of a Web community through applications of graph theory and social network analysis. These similarities lead towards a progress in knowledge representation and management on the Web [6]. Out of the many social network models on the Web, most commonly used one is called a referral network. In such a network, each node in the social network provides a set of links to its acquaintances that in turn become member nodes of the network. In the same way, these new nodes bring their acquaintances to the network again. This way the social network keeps on growing. So, the social network on the Web gives rise to an evolutionary graph. At any instant of time, when a query is raised on such an evolutionary graph, a snapshot of the concerned network, i.e. the node-edge structure at the instant of query, is considered for the purpose of query processing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Complex Query Processing on Web Graph: A Social Network Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.