Shedding Light on Gelli Dywyll's Medieval History; Y Ty Cymreig Visits an Oak Framed House in Montgomeryshire This Week, as Marred Jones Explains

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 11, 2008 | Go to article overview

Shedding Light on Gelli Dywyll's Medieval History; Y Ty Cymreig Visits an Oak Framed House in Montgomeryshire This Week, as Marred Jones Explains


Byline: Marred Jones

THE intrepid Y Ty Cymreig trio reach the end of their journey around the old counties of Wales this week.

Series presenter Aled Samuel, architectural historian Greg Stevenson and faithful sidekick, Minti the dalmatian, having explored historical houses of interest all over Wales, bring their wandering to an end in Montgomeryshire, which first became a county under Tudor rule.

It's a beautiful, tranquil landscape where oak trees have always flourished. It's no surprise, therefore, to hear Greg explain that oak framed houses are a traditional feature of this county.

And the first house they visit is indeed an oak framed house although that's not at first apparent.

Gelli Dywyll is the home of retired art teacher Peter Markey, and his wife, Beryl, who is a potter.

They've lived here for 23 years, loving its tranquility, having moved from Falmouth in Cornwall when Peter decided to give up his teaching job.

"I have a Welsh background.

My father was a Liverpudlian of Welsh descent and my mother came from Llanrug in Gwynedd," explains Beryl. "I was therefore drawn to Wales and we'd been looking for a house here for two years.

"We came round the corner and knew it was the one for us. It was in a terrible state, and we rescued it! It's in the middle of such beautiful, unspoilt countryside, it's just wonderful."

The original house was late medieval, a rear wing was added in the 17th century, with more changes occurring in the 18th century.

But in parts of the house the original timber frame can be seen, and there's also a huge old fireplace.

Aled and Greg are also impressed by the early Georgian staircase. …

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Shedding Light on Gelli Dywyll's Medieval History; Y Ty Cymreig Visits an Oak Framed House in Montgomeryshire This Week, as Marred Jones Explains
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