Introduction


What was it like when you were a kid?

What games did you play? Did you walk or ride a bike to school? And when school broke for lunch--what did you eat?

Many of us remember childhood as a time of freedom. Our activities changed with the seasons. In summer, there were fast-paced outdoor games, swimming and a hundred other ways to spend those lazy dog days. Fall meant school, but it also brought apple picking, pumpkin carving and pranks at Halloween. Winter meant sledding, building snowmen, playing with your siblings (or perhaps just doing your best to annoy them), or learning to chop wood with your dad. And spring, of course, meant that summer was just around the corner.

Sound idyllic? Perhaps.

But ask anyone over twenty and they'll probably tell you that's how they spent their days. Ask anyone over fifty and you might even hear harrowing tales of walking nine miles to school ... uphill ... both ways ... in snow.

However, for many American children today most of their time is spent indoors, whether it's watching television, playing video games, instant messaging or talking on cell phones. And at a time when food is more plentiful in America than ever, with prepackaged, calorie-packed fast foods available in every city, suburb and small town, it's no surprise that many children's figures are changing with their habits.

This month's Special Report--Fighting Childhood Obesity covers an issue that may be surprising to some, but all too real to others. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, about one in five children in the United States is considered overweight. This Special Report is not intended to single out overweight kids or parents, or try to lecture anyone about how--or what--they should eat. The articles included here are designed to inform: of what America's children are eating, what's in the food they're eating, and perhaps most importantly, what they're being served for lunch at school. Considering the long-term consequences (overweight adolescents have a 70 percent chance of becoming overweight or obese adults), it's an issue that affects us all.

"The Rising Epidemic of Childhood Obesity," presented by the Department of Health and Human Services, provides a detailed outline of the current state of children's health when concerning their weight. Citing study after study, this article shows that since the 1970s "the number of adolescents who are overweight has tripled since 1980 and the prevalence among younger children has more than doubled." This article provides insight into some of the causes of this startling rise in obesity, from socioeconomic issues to advertising to the state of America's "disappearing sidewalks." In addition, the article cites evidence that children are spending less and less time being active. "Exercise is an important part of children's health," says Dr. Andrea Hayes-Jordan, a pediatric surgeon with Holy Cross Hospital and Children's National Medical Center. Still, "less than 36 percent of elementary and secondary schools offer daily physical education classes."

Many schools, however, have taken notice. In the article "No More Sugar! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Introduction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.