Terrorism and Organized Hate Crime: Intelligence Gathering, Analysis and Investigations, Second Edition

By Barnie, Adrian A. | Security Management, December 2007 | Go to article overview

Terrorism and Organized Hate Crime: Intelligence Gathering, Analysis and Investigations, Second Edition


Barnie, Adrian A., Security Management


***** Terrorism and Organized Hate Crime: Intelligence Gathering, Analysis and Investigations, Second Edition. By Michael R. Ronczkowski; published by CRC Press, www.crcpress.com (Web); 392 pages; $89.95.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Over the years the investigative process has changed dramatically. Gone are the days of simply gathering data on incidents and crimes and submitting reports. As hate and terror organizations become more complex, investigators must collect intelligence and properly analyze it to keep pace. This book offers excellent insight into the process that professionals could apply in all investigative areas.

Author Michael R. Ronczkowski outlines six basic forms of terrorism, includ ing nuclear, biological, and narco-terrorism, and further elaborates on each form, citing numerous acts, both domestic and international. Ronczkowski explains the process of "enhanced" analysis, which he says generally involves the gathering of information, its interpretation, and trans forming that information into valid and useable intelligence. The ultimate goal is to anticipate threatening behavior.

One of the book's most interesting chapters covers future threats, with extensive information and foresight on cyber terrorism. …

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