Gleeful in Tehran; Regime Welcomes U.S. Economic Woes

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 22, 2008 | Go to article overview

Gleeful in Tehran; Regime Welcomes U.S. Economic Woes


Byline: Jonathan Schanzer, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As Americans struggle with the loss of wealth resulting from the ongoing credit crunch, subprime mortgage meltdown, and subsequent stock drops, the leading figures of the Islamic Republic of Iran are cheering unabashedly.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad gloated recently that the United States is paying the price for exporting inflation and deficits to the rest of the world, "Now the world capacity is full and these problems have returned ...

And finally they are oppressors, and systems based on oppression and unrighteous positions will not endure," he said

Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, also reveled in the financial crisis, expressing his hope that it marked the end of U.S. domination over the world economy. The false bubble of money in the West has broken, he said on state television, adding that the recent mortgage meltdown was the beginning of the end for free market capitalism.

Similarly, Iranian Guardian Council secretary and interim Friday prayer leader Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati professed that the U.S.'s economic crisis was divine punishment. He stated, we are happy that the United States economy has come across difficulty. They are attesting unfavorable consequences of their conduct.They are experiencing divine punishment. We are happy over that. The unhappier they become, the happier we get, as they become happy as we get unhappy. He said that Americans could expect to be slapped in the face by Islam, Muslims, and the Islamic Revolution.

That slap in the face may come in the form of Iran-induced higher oil prices. Indeed, Iran's Oil Minister Gholam Hossein Nozari recently told reporters at an energy conference, $100 and below is not suitable for oil producers or oil consumers. Iran, of course, is the world's fourth-largest exporter, and ranks among the more powerful members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), a corrupt cartel that determines the level of oil production, which directly impacts the cost of oil.

Surging fuel prices have crippled U.S. consumers in recent years, adding to mounting concerns over whether America is about to enter or has already entered an economic recession.

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