Maths Can Beat Terror - by Lord Bhattacharyya; EMERGING MARKETS ECONOMICS Power of Applied Mathematics Could 'Boost Security'

The Birmingham Post (England), October 23, 2008 | Go to article overview

Maths Can Beat Terror - by Lord Bhattacharyya; EMERGING MARKETS ECONOMICS Power of Applied Mathematics Could 'Boost Security'


Byline: BYDUNCAN TIFT Deputy Business Editor

Midland academic and manufacturing champion Lord Kumar Bhattacharyya has used the opening of the Research CouncilUK's first office in India to press the case for applied maths as an important weapon in the war against global terrorism.

LordBhattacharyya, head ofWarwick Manufacturing Group, said if a stable security environment could be guaranteed then this would go a long way towards creating a solid platform for economic growth.

Speaking in NewDelhi, he said:"We all live in the shadow of modern terrorism.

"Terror has becomethe great destabilising force in democratic societies, the knowledge that a small group of people with murderous intent can cause havoc anywhere and to anybody.

"Themassive flows of data and people that make internat ional terrorism so threatening alsomeanthat security of information is not an issue restricted to intelligence services."

"As information is centralised and stored electronically it becomes vulnerable to those who wish to access it for malicious purposes, for example identify theft and financial fraud.

"To fight this we can draw on the power of applied mathematics," he added. WMG, he noted, had recently created a new e-security group which combines mathematics and computer science with expertise from the defence sector "to highlight the problem and focus on helping companies, large and small". It was also an area where Indian researchers had excelled and where both India and the UK could work together.

Similarly, energy issues were fuelling the potential for world conflict.

Lord Bhattacharyya said: "This will become more important as demand for energy becomes one of the defining features of our global environment.

"We can see the after effects of increasing energy demand, not just in oil prices, but in the debate over the future of Iran's nuclear programme, and in the politics of the Middle East.

"Many of these social conflicts are ripples caused by the need for economies to secure their energy future." He said that if ways of managing this demand more effectively could be found, the long term consequenceswould not just be less polluting cars or more efficient factories, but a less dangerous world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Maths Can Beat Terror - by Lord Bhattacharyya; EMERGING MARKETS ECONOMICS Power of Applied Mathematics Could 'Boost Security'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.